REVIEW: The Games/Private Rio by James Patterson & Mark Sullivan


I am not a fan of Private Series but this book, Private Rio or famously known as The Games has forced me to rethink my paradigm about the series. In past, I have accused James Patterson and his co-authored books being not upto the mark once, or may be more but Private Rio or The Games, if you prefer, definitely raises the bar of my expectations from him and his works.

If you are familiar with Patterson’s style of writing you can rightly expect the chapters being short in format and plot be fast paced to create a sense of thrill among its readers. The idea behind this genre is all about the reader to keep guessing of what will happen next. The novel starts with a prelude though without any mention that takes the reader back in 2014 when FIFA World Cup was held in Brazil where Jack Morgan head of the renowned investigation service PRIVATE is in charge of security of that event. Two years after, Rio is hosting Olympics and Jack Morgan’s Private is again the head of security along with support of Rio’s Police. One thing, I like to compliment the authors on using the real time frame, the FIFA World Cup & the Rio Olympics. It clearly shows a sense of connecting to the reader, a very realistic approach and they have chosen the right moment to release the book.

Continue reading “REVIEW: The Games/Private Rio by James Patterson & Mark Sullivan”

Let’s Read James Patterson

James Patterson is  a machine when comes to writing and publishing books. For almost half a year, one or the other from his books is on New York Times Bestseller List. People read him. His books are fast paced and you can manage to read one of them while traveling to your work in day or two (assuming the distance between your work and where you live is nearly 2 hours) or if you want to accomplish reading in shorter period of time frame and some of his books are able to satisfy the demands of voracious readers. I mean the usual: the P/PC balance between the plot and its characters.

I haven’t ready of his book in a long time. It has been almost two years since I read any of his title and the last one I remember reading is I, Alex Cross. Few years back in the post, Mistress by James Patterson & David Ellis, I admitted that Mr. Patterson’s books are worth reading only when they are written solo and not co-authored along with anyone. At that time, I met some disappointments with his Private Series. Then I came across Alex Cross series which undoubtedly are good books though I haven’t explored it very much in-depth.

Here is a complete list of books written by James Patterson that have been or are releasing this year:

NYPD RED 4 | 4 Feb ’16


PRIVATE PARIS | 21 Mar ’16


15th AFFAIR | 7 Mar ’16

CROSS KILLS | 7 June ’16

ZOO 2 | 7 June ’16

THE GAMES |  27 June ’16

HUMANS, BOW DOWN | 1 August ’16

Recently with release of his new book, The Games which is a part of Private series and is co-authored by Mark Sullivan, I am going to try again and see if his co-authored books show some signs improvement lately. By improvement I mean the obvious: plot and characters.


Do you read James Patterson?

BOOK REVIEW: Lemon Girl by Jyoti Arora

Sometimes, when in life, there aren’t enough twists and turns, my suggestion is to pick a book that has enough twists and turns to keep you interested. A book in that kind of category might be hard to find when you need it the most, but sometimes you just have to look on your book-shelf, read some back cover blurbs and Viola! You did it. Now go back to your comfort zone and start reading it.

Similar production is Jyoti Arora’s Lemon Girl. The book is full of aforementioned twists and turns that goes with the character reflecting their lives as real as our reality is present in front of us. The book is a fast pace read as it alternates between the first person narratives.

To indulge this book in your intellectual there is a definitive understanding of characters, to question their motives, and analyse them rationally. I feel the character of Arsh, the narrator other than the protagonist, is the way to do so.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Lemon Girl by Jyoti Arora”

A Half Yearly Reading List

Half of the year has gone, and we have our noses inside the books we are reading and our thoughts mingling around the books we want to read. 2016 has not been so much of a reading year for me as 2015 was. But I have read some good books and few great ones too. Thus, I am compiling a list of books that I have read this year and would like to share with you. Worth taking a look:

Book Review | Amazon

Some practical words of wisdom to configure one’s life.

Book Review | Amazon

One does not has to attend or get some modern education on attaining the creativity. There is no fountain of creativity to drink from. One has to read this book.

Amazon

John William’s book Stoner barely sold when it came out in 1965. Now, it is one of the great American novels of 20th Century.

Book Review | Amazon


What are some books that you have read this year and would you like to recommend to a fellow reader? Do comment below.

BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross

The Calling is the first novel featuring DCI John Luther. Yes, the same Luther you saw on telly as I did, played by Idris Elba. There are so many DC’s and DCI’s the modern British Crime Fiction has produced, so why bother about this one? As usually, he is tortured and that is interesting. Aren’t all?

DCI John Luther has a clearance rate of cases which is extraordinary as it is portrayed by Neil Cross in the telly series too, in the first few episodes. If you have watched the series or/are planning to, you can still read the book. The consequences of this book are what followed by the television series. It’s a prequel.

The plot is simple, John Luther is hunting for a brutal murderer and baby kidnapper who intends to do what he has done again. Now, the most extraordinary thing is there in this simplicity and the credit goes to the author of the book, Neil Cross. The opening scene is do dramatised and there a few more to grab, I feel as if it was a real crime scene in front of me. Every detail is spectacularly written, and very rare in crime fiction novels do you find such generous reception. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross”

Author Interview: Aditi Bose

Aditi Bose

THE WRITING PART

Q. Thank you for agreeing to this interview. Briefly, about yourself?

I’m a mother, a foodie, a traveller, a dreamer, an author, a book reviewer, a blogger. Phew! Too many things:)

Q. What genre is/are your book(s)?

Romance. And then more romance.

Q. What draws you to this genre?

It’s the most complicated and the most beautiful emotion to write about.

Q. Briefly, what led up to last book? Also, Please describe what the story/book is about in one sentence.

I wrote the last book when I was going through a tough phase in my life. When I started writing, I was clueless what the story would be about. It was more of “Let me write because it keeps my mind from thinking of sad thoughts.”

My Dream Man‘ is about changing relationship between a student and her teacher.

Q. What was the time frame for writing your last book?

I finished half the book in a few weeks and then there was along gap before the rest was completed. It wasn’t a writer’s block, but a phase where I wanted to shut out the world.

Q. How much research do you do?

Not much unless it’s essential. Somehow, the more research I get myself into, the worse the flow of the book becomes.

Q. Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day?

No. None at all. I can’t work under stringent rules.

Q. What is the easiest thing about writing? 

It’s your creativity so there’s no one to stop you from saying what you want to say.

Q. What motivates you to write?

I don’t know if it’s motivation or not, but if there’s a thought that starts to play in my mind, I have to write it down. Often these leads up to stories or blog posts. Continue reading “Author Interview: Aditi Bose”

BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett

Self-help genre is not for everyone. Especially not for me. Either it is too positive for a dream to come true in man’s life that is unachievable (and for my taste) or it is too boring. But they are a business, in a big business. Dr. Michael Bennet (a psychiatrist) and his daughter/writer Sarah Bennet suggests we are too emotional over self-help books. Actually, not only self-help books, but about everything.

The title of the book, F*ck Feelings: One Shrink’s Practical Advice for Managing All Life’s Impossible Problems, is perfect, and certainly matches the context inside as the book provides some practical solutions to common problems we all face at various times in our lives. The target audience of this book are people who loath self-help books, but I would recommend this to those who love self-help books too. It’s a new insight to very common discussion regarding self-improvement, self-esteem, life’s fairness and unfairness, over helpfulness, serenity or the peace of mind, love, communication, parenthood, assholes, and treatment. It’s about understanding oneself.

This book is about how we over think about every situation as how we let our emotions control our sanity and disrupt our daily/hourly musings. We want to accomplish things that are not pragmatically possible for any living creature, emotionally. I am not saying we should not try for things which many think are cuffed by the word impossible, it’s all about self-control. But try to understand the stuff this books covers and I am talking about are different from the stuff people you are surrounded with may implicitly suggest impossible. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett”