Author Interview: Jean Nicole Rivers

THE WRITING PART

Jean Nicole Rivers

Q. Thank you for agreeing to this interview. Briefly, about yourself?

I have always loved to write, even as a child and I always aspired to become a novelist. The Unwanted is the second book in a series called, Black Water Tales.

Q. What genre are is/your book(s)?

New adult, psychological horror.

Q. What draws you to this genre?

To me, horror feels more real than any other genre. I have always preferred real and true, no matter how dirty or uncomfortable. The situations in horror, life or death, kill or die, save them or save myself are the closest we come to seeing who we truly are in the deepest places of our psychic and physical being and this is what produces that oh so well-known adrenaline pump that hooks people to the horror book or screen, not allowing them to look away. Living those moments over and over has the power to give us a true glimpse into the mirror and sometimes, ironically enough, that is the most frightening thing of all.

Q. Briefly, what led up to the last book? Also, please describe the book in one sentence.

When Blaire goes to help the children of St. Sebastian orphanage, it will be her that soon needs the help.

Soon after completing my first book, The Secret Keepers. I found myself watching an inordinate amount of documentaries and I came across one on orphanages in other countries and what I learned was frightening. I don’t much care for jump scare horror, I prefer horror that chills one to the core that makes you question, not what’s in the closet but what’s in the mirror. This documentary on the deplorable conditions of the facilities and the failing health of the children haunted me, how could things like this still be happening all around us? And while I was intrigued, I was not yet fully inspired to write the book, writing the book still hadn’t occurred to me. It wasn’t until one evening after watching this documentary when I woke in the middle of the night and there they were, those children who were severely malnourished and abused among other things, all standing by my bedside looking down on me. When I woke the next morning, I knew that I had to tell their story.

Q. What was the time frame for writing your last book?

There were four years between my last book, The Secret Keepers and my new book, The Unwanted. Writing my outline takes approx. two weeks, then another six weeks to write my rough draft, a couple of months for my first edit and a couple more months for further edits and that is if I am working on my book full time but once you add “life” in, the timeframe can get lengthy.

Q. How much research do you do?

It depends on what I am writing. Many things I write from personal experience. My new book that I am currently working on, The Sandman (working title), is requiring me to do a bit more research than usual and I have purchased several books on the underlying subjects and plan on talking to a couple of health professionals in order to make sure that my characters are authentic.

Q. Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day?

I measure more in hours per day than word count. I try to write for at least two hours a day, but I always wish that I could write more.

Q. What is the easiest thing about writing?

The easiest thing about writing a book is coming up with the idea. We all have tons of great ideas for books, right? The issues come AFTER we have the great idea.

Q. What motivates you to write?

I don’t know that it’s a motivation so much as a compulsion. Naturally, I am always composing stories and filling my head with little facts and characters and I have to get them out. I have to tell their stories or they will drive me nuts. I am a writer because it is an inevitable extension of my being. Some people decide to be writers because they want to write; I was never given the option.

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REVIEW: Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

I must confess I have never read any book of the Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. And for the time being I cannot confirm to do so. Though I am familiar with Neil Gaiman’s writing which sometimes fascinates me. Coraline and Sandman series are a good place to start with Neil Gaiman, only if you are unfamiliar.

Good Omens is a collaborative work and unlike any other co-authored books (I am pointing to Patterson and Co.), it’s different and points out some good things about society and religion in general. Overall, this book is a piece of fantasy and show signs of humour from the start.

One, if highly familiar with both Gaiman’s and Pratchett’s style of writing might able to point out tiny bit of difference in the text but I think it is not much of a difference. The plot consists of angels and demons, good and evil and a tale of bonding between the two. The demon as we may call some of them, are not different and nor are the angels. In the start, a funny thing happens that develops the whole book and plot revolves around that part.

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AUTHOR INTERVIEW: Yolanda De Iullis

THE WRITING PART

Q. Hi Yolanda and thank you for agreeing to this interview. Congratulations on your new book: “Memoirs of I”. Briefly, tell me about yourself?

Hey Aman, first of all.  Thank you for inviting me to your blog and reviewing my new book.  I am from a small town in Scotland but grew up with an Italian/Irish background.  I currently study Classical Studies along side Modern Greek.  I write for pleasure and hopefully teach another, I also find solitude in traveling and do it as much as I can.

Q. What was the genesis for “MEMOIRS OF I”?

I was going through some personal troubles in 2015 and I needed a friend.  My memoir became my best friend and it turned out to be the most therapeutic encounter I have ever experienced.  I wanted to reflect on a daily basis to overcome these troubles in which caused me anguish and confusion.

Q. In “MEMOIRS OF I”, one thing I like most is that you have kept the reader in mystery regarding the place you are currently visiting. This mystery element works well (for me) in your book. How did you manage to create such mysteries for a reader?

I am glad that you liked this element about my book.  It was sometimes difficult to not shout out to the reader where I was in the world but I wanted to keep this very personal to me so that the reader can imagine wherever they wish.  This was all a very natural process during my writings.

Q. How much research do you usually do?

I tend not to do much research when it comes to writings styles and the latest authors as I never want to be influenced from any other.  I want and like to write which comes from my heart and only my soul.  In The Memoirs of ‘I’, I researched subjects such as religion, politics, art, documentaries and peoples beliefs to enhance my awareness of the world around me and to tell others of how it had influenced me in that moment.

Q. Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day?

No, I have never written in this way before unless I am doing essays for university but when it comes to writing, I feel that it should not be forced or commanded in such a way.

Q. What motivates you to write?

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REVIEW: Seneca On Anger

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, or Seneca was a philosopher and is best known for his wisdom that may help one to rethink of his own perspectives on life. Seneca was a stoic and during his time embraced Stoicism. He was also an advisor to the Roman Emperor, Nero, in 54 AD. His essays such as On Shortness of Life, and On Anger clearly reflect his contribution to the Stoic philosophy.

Surprisingly, I was never introduced to the word Stoicism before. Not during my school years, nor my college years. I guess, it is my mistake that I was never curious enough to explore, open to ideas such as Stoicism posses, until recently when I first read Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations.

On Anger is a book which is further divided into three books in which Seneca reflects how this passion, this feeling can make us endure for the rest of our lives. He describes anger as an emotion, “and under its possession any human being does remain not humane.” We have all felt anger, on various points. Sometimes it us, many a times it because of the others, we may think. Some follow it is quite pragmatically causing terror that reflect up on the rest of the humanity. Some just want to avenge on the injury they have become a victim to:

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The Secret Life of a Book Blogger

Credit: Paperback brii

This is my first attempt to participate in a book tag or a book award. In time, I have been nominated by fellow bloggers for awards but I never took any particular interest in responding and to continue the tradition from my side. My apologies. However, I tend to enjoy the questionnaire of these book tags and blogger awards since it is fun and informative when bloggers share their experience through these variety of posts.

Nobody nominated me this time for The Secret Life of a Book Blogger Tag but I feel motivated to do this myself. Hopefully, you’ll enjoy this type. I’d like to thank QuirkyVictorian from Over Analysing Literature for introducing me to this tag. Do check out her blog, she’s a bibliophile just like you and me.

How long have you been a blogger?

This is my first book blog and I have been dragging on for four years now.

At what point do you think you will stop?

When I am sucked out of all the energy inside me, or when I stop reading books.

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BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz

Let’s talk about reading books on books. Reading books on books is a constant reminder on why I love to read. Ruined by Reading offers a somewhat a deep insight on why we read and how what we read might shape our lives. It provides an interesting, curiosity arousing introduction to reading variety of books. Also, the title is captivating as well as ironical.

As we grow up and pretend to become more mature, our reading changes with us. The desire to read almost every book still remains but has taken a different form and shape inside me. We understand more, with age, the usefulness of reading a book.

Schwartz’s book reminded me of times when I was indulging myself into this vast world of reading. Schwartz understand and clearly observes that how obsessive are the readers. She then discusses how books have small part, Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz”

Merits of Reading (e)Books

Source: Tor.com

Having a book to read on the fly is a wonderful advantage that an ebook reading application or an eReader provides. In this digital age, we are doing it wrong if we are mingling with thought of “Ebooks vs Books” paradigm. There is no debate, there is no question in that. If we want to read, we must read. Ebooks can be read practically anywhere on anything whether you have a phone, a tablet or a laptop (However, I don’t like reading “books” on my laptop) or an eReader.

The argument of Ebooks vs. Books is wrongly build, since a physical copy of a book is always and will always be an ideal format. The feeling of holding a book and grasping lines after lines with your eyes might be indispensable but to satisfy our thirst of reading it is up to us on how we can take advantage of both formats in our daily lives.

Source: Cyanide & Happiness

I am an avid reader and most of the books that I read are in Ebook format. I am always carrying my smartphone and there are tons of applications that support the common formats like .epub or .mobi. Most apps even offer customisations according the day/night light and the background paper just to ease the stress on your eyes. Most apps do provide an average text-to-speech feature which works great when you want to give your eyes some rest.

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