Books

Ernest Hemingway’s reading list for all the Young Writers

In 1934, a young man who wanted to be a writer hitchhiked to Florida to meet his idol, Ernest Hemingway. Only because he read a story by Hemingway in Cosmopolitan, called “One Trip Across”, he traveled all they way from Minnesota to Florida. This young man soon becomes Hemingway’s assistant on a pay a dollar a day. He advised this young man to avoid contemporary writers and compete only with the dead ones whose works have stood the test of time and made him a list of two short stories and fourteen books and handed over to this young man. The list:

    • “The Blue Hotel” by Stephen Crane
    • “The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane
    • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
    • Dubliners by James Joyce
    • The Red and the Black by Stendhal
    • Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
    • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    • Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
    • Hail and Farewell by George Moore
    • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    • The Oxford Book of English Verse
    • The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings
    • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    • Far Away and Long Ago by W.H. Hudson
    • The American by Henry James

Here is the original image of the list:

When I read about this list and that young man I went into a deep thought of how a veteran author be a mentor of an young aspiring writer. In this process, both the writers can learn something from each other and share their experiences. Surely, someone like Ernest Hemingway, will be a good mentor.

 

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17 thoughts on “Ernest Hemingway’s reading list for all the Young Writers”

      1. Growth of the Soil is his best, in my humble opinion. The characters are stoic, patient Norwegians struggling to live off the land, and what a severe, yet beautiful land it is.

        It’s free at Gutenberg.

        Like

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