Essay

Why Bother Reading More?

I usually read 90 to 110 books a year as I have only been recording  my reading habit through a widget on Goodreads.com called Yearly Reading Challenge from past four years. It’s fun thing to do, you get to know exact statistics like how many number of pages one has read in total or a graph showing books read by you in the year they were published. It can also go otherwise for some of us, like having no time to read, and your ‘yearly reading challenge’ displaying that you are 3 books behind your schedule. Then some of us might force our way to do so.

You are forgetting the whole point of reading. I do not read books for these mere statistics, I read books because of the benefits it offers. If you develop a habit of reading books, at least 5 to 10 pages a day, you will become smarter over the years, this self improvement thing is extremely important aspect for being an adult. A book doesn’t have to be a self-help rather a fiction, science or philosophical work which is full of ideas that you cannot gather by skimming articles reading online. 

There is a difference in reading a book and reading an article online. When reading a book, you spent a good amount of time but on reading online most of us are in a hurry. It’s not totally our fault. It is part habit and part brain simulation. After spending a good amount of time with a book, the text of the book is tend to remain in our memory longer than the those articles. I come across more than fifty different articles everyday regarding, technology, web development, books, reviews, news but by the end of the day, only a few of them, hardly one or two of them I am able to recall. The most important articles I read, I either bookmark the link or save it somewhere on a sticky note on my desktop.

Reading more books also help you gain knowledge. Let’s say of you want to do a research on a specific topic, reading 100 to 200 articles won’t help rather reading 40 to 60 books will do. The numbers in the context are of course, arbitrary. Ignorance is not a bliss, you can’t o something about you don’t know. Learning about yourself, the surroundings around you is essential and reading books can help better since the mental effort put by you in reading each and every single book is totally worth. Reading is an active activity and not a passive one such as watching television.

So boys and girls, get your books/ e-readers out, and start reading.

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34 thoughts on “Why Bother Reading More?”

  1. So true! I write historical fiction and I love all the online tools available for aiding in historical research, but NOTHING I can find online gives me anywhere near the depth that reading books (fiction as well as nonfiction) that have been written about the Era and we’re written during the era. Read on!

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  2. Wonderful post. The Goodreads yearly challenge had made me care more about the number of books I read rather than the quality of them. This year I’ve tried to prioritize quality over quantity (without it necessarily meaning I’m reading less) and I need to remind this to myself every now and then.

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  3. The Goodreads challenge is a mixed blessing and a curse for me! Since joining Goodreads I’ve definitely read more in general, but last year found myself reading short books as quickly as possible just to reach my target – definitely a case of quantity over quality!

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  4. Agree with your post there. Reading is a wonderful thing. As you grow older the pressures of life leave you little time to do so. However if the book is good enough I can still put everything on hold to get through it.

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  5. I couldn’t agree more. I have orientation to volunteer at a literacy place/non-profit used bookstore tomorrow. They tutor people who do not have very high literacy and also those whose first language is not English, and I happen to have a TESOL certification. But I hope I get to teach the people who speak English but aren’t, for whatever reason, fully literate. That would be such a job.

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  6. I totally agree about the Goodreads-style challenges tricking you into reading for quantity instead of quality. I completed a 100 Book Challenge a couple of years ago, and I found myself finishing books I didn’t care for because I couldn’t afford to quit a book 100 pages in. I didn’t have time for that because of the challenge. I completed it (103 books by that December 31st), but I decided not to push myself that far.

    I still have a Goodreads goal, but it’s a more modest 50 books, and serves more as a reminder to get me out to the library or bookstore so I don’t get busy and forget to go.

    Speaking of which, I need to go and finish reading my current pick…

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  7. Reblogged this on Nash Training Systems and commented:
    For the last couple years I had a mental block preventing me from reading even though I used to love it as a child. During High School, I was forced to read so much irrelevant stuff that I had a hard time reading more than 1 chapter, sometimes even 1 paragraph. Still I bought myself books, because I do love them. My interest shifted immensely over the years and I developed a tendency to read “How-To” and Textbook style books. Always with the intent to enhance my knowledge and broaden my horizons.
    This year I set myself the goal to read 1 book pre month and i’m on track to do so. It is not about the statistic, but rather the fact that I possess the opportunity to become smarter and more knowledgable through reading on a constant basis.

    As Aman says: “If you develop a habit of reading books, at least 5 to 10 pages a day, you will become smarter over the years, this self improvement thing is extremely important aspect for being an adult.”

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