BOOK REVIEW: Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss

My Rating: 5/5

My Rating: 5/5

I introduced myself to Tim Ferriss last year when I randomly found a post on his blog in which he had interviewed Maria Popova. Actually, I was searching for Brain Picking’s Maria Popova’s interviews as she is such an inspiring blogging personality, the way she curate the content for every post is amazing and seems an example of a creative process, just right out of her imagination.You must check out Brain Pickings. Moreover, scan through Tim Ferriss’ blog which is called FourHourWorkWeek.com and got introduced to his podcast, The Tim Ferriss Show [Podcast Link]. He has done an amazing job by taking more than hundred 60+ minute interviews with some of the successful and interesting people by digging deep into their “mind”, process of their workings, process of maintaining their bodies, listening to their suggestions and how do they motivate, inspire, live and do something that they love to do.

Tools of Titans is an enormous collection of bits and pieces of interviews that are available on his podcast and highlights the major theme of most of the interviews Tim has included in this book. The book is huge, exceeding 700 pages and is certainly not meant to be read all at once. It’s not Tolstoy’s War and Peace or David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest that you can read continuously without moving your body parts for next 7 to 10 days or so. Bear in mind, reading Tools of Titans will take more than that many days since it has a sheer amount of practical information to be processed by our mind. I’d recommend you to take your time with each interview described by Tim, think over it, if there’s a book recommended in between as there are so some interesting book recommendations, try to read few of them or at least do a little research on why the book is being recommended, what’s there inside and is the book for you? Then you can definitely add it to your TBR.

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REVIEW: Maus – My Father Bleeds History

I picked this book on a friend’s recommendation and I must say, while reading it, I could not put it down. Maus is a two part series graphic novel written by American cartoonist and contributing artist for The New YorkerArt Spiegelman. It’s also a memoir as well as an autobiographical work.

After reading it, I was surprised how much I enjoyed this graphic novel. There is a uniqueness to the concept and the how it is illustrated with story telling. Art Spiegelman has done a great job with story telling, I must say. The illustration or the graphical part is an excellent addition to decipher the incidents or certain scenarios the author wants the reader to focus on.

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Goodreads Reading Challenge 2016

My 2016 Reading Challenge hosted by Goodreads.com began with the start of this amazing year. This year, I challenged myself to read 150 books, incrementing the amount of books from last year’s challenge(2015) by 25. At first I wasn’t event sure that I’d be able to complete the challenge and then after doing a good start and reading a proper amount of books and then failing to find overcome the procrastination of not reading, I found myself in a fumbling three months back. I was behind in the challenge by almost a decade of books and was ready to give up. I am below par as not exceeding my limit of 150 books this year in contrast with the last year in which I exceeded by a good margin.

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Top NonFiction Books I Read in 2016 Part 1

As this year is closing down, I have decided to produce some lists under the title “Read in 2016” for you such that would have more trouble managing your TBR lists next year (*grin*). More titles to add to you to-read lists. Well that’s the whole intention of all book lists such as the Top Tens, and the Top Fives, of the year, to introduce you to books that , are the chances, you might have not read and I will try every ounce to convince to at least take look at the titles over Goodreads.com or Amazon and may be, add to your wishlist/TBR/to-read list.

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AUTHOR INTERVIEW: Andrew Joyce

THE WRITING PART

Q. Thank you for agreeing to this interview. Briefly, about yourself?

My name is Andrew Joyce and I write books for a living. I live on a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with my dog, Danny.

Q. What genre is/are your book(s)?

Historical Fiction and Action/Adventure

Q. What draws you to this genre?

I really don’t know. I come across a subject that interests me, I research that subject, I come up with a story to encompass that subject, and then it’s off to the races, so to speak.

Q. Briefly, what led up to last/latest book? Also, Please describe what the story/book is about in one sentence.

I read a short article about “the largest mass execution in the history of the United States.” That intrigued me. As I researched it, one thing led to another and the next thing I knew, I was writing about eighty-five years of American history.

Yellow Hair documents the injustices done to the Sioux Nation from their first treaty with the United States in 1805 through Wounded Knee in 1890.

Q. What was the time frame for writing your last book?

Six years. I did one year of research for Yellow Hair, and spent eight months writing it. I then put it away and wrote other books. But during that time, I’d pull it out and work on it (editing, rewriting, etc.).

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BOOK REVIEW: Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

This book is a great introduction to start on the matter of educating yourself in terms of “money”. This is the message Robert Kiyosaki wants to convey in this 200 pages long book.

This book isn’t about money, it is about how we think and are taught to think from an early age about money and not in terms of money. Education brings wisdom in a person but to be educated in terms of money or in Kiyosaki’s words, being “financially literate” is an important aspect of how we are going to solve the money problems we face everyday and for the rest of our lives. Working hard, keeping our day jobs at bay is an effort we all try to make but only to pay bills. Kiyosaki explains the difference between assets and liabilities and how apart from paying bills, we can earn money in longer terms and for better future.

Kiyosaki addresses his two fathers in this book, one who is highly educated in terms of academia, and the other is educated in terms of being wealthy and making “money work for him”. One father advises him on to get a college degree and get a job that is secured and other puts emphasis on being learning how money, market, and related terminology like accounting works. In other terms getting little knowledge of how everything is part of the same cycle and you must how that cycle runs otherwise being unfamiliar with one section of that cycle can harm you in long term. In his simple narrative, the author compares both aspects by narrating stories that include both his fathers and what suggestions they gave him and how he draw his own conclusions and his emphasis on where he combine best of both the worlds.

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How to Read a Book?

If you are reading this post, then you are certain about the importance of ‘reading’.

To acquire knowledge with aim of increasing one’s understanding, is reading enough? The answer is yes, but the question remains, how?

We need to think about how we read and Mortimer Adler’s How to Read a Book is a perfect place to start with. Published in 1940, it immediately became a bestseller, and since that time the book has been updated many times, famously and notably by Charles van Doren in the 1970’s.

Most of the times, we think reading is something that you can do or you cannot – that is you can either read or not. The truth, however, is that reading is a skill that can be improved with knowledge and practice.

The goal of reading determines how you read. If you’re reading for entertainment, you’re going to read a lot differently and likely different material than if you’re reading to increase understanding. There’s nothing wrong in reading for entertainment but ask yourself, are you really learning anything new? Continue reading “How to Read a Book?”