Authors, Interviews

Author Interview: Sindhu Rajasekaran 

 

Sindhu Rajasekaran is a thirty-one-year-old engineer-turned-writer, and a Bharatnatyam dancer. Kaleidoscopic Reflections her first novel was longlisted for the Crossword Book Award in 2011.

Q. Hello Sindhu, and thank you for agreeing this interview and congratulations on your book, ‘Kaleidoscopic Reflections’. Tell me a little about yourself and your background?

I’m a writer, film producer and communications consultant. A bit of a nomad really. I do everything that strikes my fancy.

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Authors, Books, Interviews

Author Interview: Christopher Brookmyre

Christopher Brookmyre is a Scottish novelist whose novels mix politics, social comment and action with a strong narrative. He has been referred to as a Tartan Noir author. His debut novel was Quite Ugly One Morning, and subsequent works have included One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night, which he said “was just the sort of book he needed to write before he turned 30”, and All Fun and Games until Somebody Loses an Eye (2005). His new novel: The Last Hack is due to release in July, 2017.

Q. Hi Christopher, and thank you for agreeing this interview. Your upcoming book, ‘The Last Hack’ is due on 4th July 2017, which is an amazing read. Tell me a little about yourself and your background?

I have been writing full-time since the publication of my first novel, Quite Ugly One Morning, back in 1996. Before that, I worked as a sub-editor on Screen International in London, then freelance at the Scotsman and the Edinburgh Evening News. I have published twenty novels, most recently The Last Hack (published in the UK as Want You Gone). I have also collaborated on the FPS videogame Bedlam, based on my novel of the same name.

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Killing of Aarushi and The Murder of Justice by Rajesh Talwar

Published: 30 March, 2017

A deep, twisty dive in an interesting true crime tale of the decade!

How often do you read True Crime stories? I am always seeking one of them. They have a way of capturing my focus for the longest period of hours. Well most crime fiction does that to me, and if it’s true, the more real, the merrier reading hours.

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Books, classics, Essay

Depression and The Yellow Wallpaper

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Before reading The Yellow Wallpaper I did not even know that a state of mind called Postpartum Depression exists. Wikipedia describes it better:

[…] is a type of clinical depression which can affect both sexes after childbirth. Symptoms may include sadness, low energy, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, reduced desire for sex, crying episodes, anxiety, and irritability. While many women experience self-limited, mild symptoms postpartum, postpartum depression should be suspected when symptoms are severe and have lasted over two weeks.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is written in 1892 as journal of a woman who failing to relish the joys of marriage and motherhood, is sentenced to a country and is forbid by her doctor and her husband to write. The novella can be regarded as the a autobiographical work of the author, Charlotte Perkins Gilman. She was a prominent figure during the first-wave feminist movement in the United States. Much of her life’s work was influenced by the experiences of her early life. [You can read the full review of The Yellow Wallpaper here].

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Announcement

I am open to Book Review Requests

Hi People,

I’ll keep this short. I have been blogging now for four years and I have written numerous book reviews, interviewed some of the best selling authors (like The Martian’s Andy Weir). I publicly announce that I am open to give my honest feedback over your book/manuscript in the form a review.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Tree with a Thousand Apples by Sanchit Gupta

Amazon

Realistic Fiction is becoming a trend these days among the readers and why not? If written beautifully, these type of stories which are an offspring of real incidents in the contemporary world have a lot to offer and reader can relate to them often. One is The Tree with a Thousand Apples by Sanchit Gupta released right in the end of last year, based in war ridden Kashmir.

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Awards

Rewarded: Best Book Blog in India 2017

Best Blogs In India

Thank you Incomeboy

This is an informal gratitude post and I’d like to thank Incomboy.com for the honour of nominating and rewarding Confessions of a Readaholic,  the blog you are currently reading, among the best Book Blogs in India, 2017. It shows that my readers are willing to trust me over their next book read. This is very generous of you all. I want to give the gratitude back by thanking each and every reader of this blog for keeping your trust in me.

I’ll keep reading and recommending you books and in hope that you will find them useful and interesting.

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Book List, Books, Fiction, science fiction

Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in June 2017

Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee

Blurb: Yoon Ha Lee’s critically acclaimed Machineries of Empire trilogy continues with Raven Stratagem, coming from Solaris Summer 2017.

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Authors, Books, Interviews

Author Interview: Anmol Chawla

Anmol Chawla, a diehard philosopher is an industrial engineer from a well-reputed college, who is trying to find innovative ways to serve humanity, as he believes only a utilitarian mindset can solve today’s complex societal issues.

BEYOND is his first work of fiction, inspired from his own experiences with the world around him. He has ventured into many social initiatives after leaving a lucrative job in a Multi-National Company. Earlier this month, I reviewed his debut book and you can read the review here. For deep dive in Anmol’s imagination, continue to read this post.

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Books, Guest Post, Non-Fiction

Guest Post: To make a writer by Peter Gray

Telemachus, how did it come about?

For someone who has spent a long career treating Thoroughbred horses – for everything from infertility to racing performance – the transformation to writer has been a long, unlikely and tenuous road.  I started dabbling with a pen back in the Seventies, realised it wasn’t a natural talent of mine, but doggedness convinced me to continue.  I read a lot of fiction, but always with reservations about copying style or ideas.  It was my aim, if I might ever succeed, to have a voice that would be distinctly my own and I didn’t want to steal anyone else’s ideas – even subconsciously.  So I muddled on and the efforts weren’t very good; if I was learning and felt there were mild signs of improvement – as well as an innate inability to accept failure.

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