5 Stars, Book Reviews, Crime & Mystery, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Domina by Lisa Hilton

Published in April, 2017

Published in India: May, 2017

Pages 400, Paperback

Judging this book by its cover 4/5

Goodreads | Amazon

Sequel to last year’s “first class thriller” Maestra which sold in more than 43 countries and soon to be turned into a movie is finally out. Written by Lisa Hilton, charmingly, both of her books, Maestra and Domina are in regard of a competitor to Fifty Shades of Grey, another bestseller, but after reading, I think there’s more than Fifty Shades in her books. Her plot creation is full of thrilling effects, and a piece of her imagination equals more than just Fifty Shades.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Domina by Lisa Hilton”

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Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction

BOOK REVEW: The Last Hack by Christopher Brookmyre

Expected publication: July 4th 2017 by Atlantic Monthly Press

Pages: 432

I have read and reviewed many British crime writers because they have that thrill even without much action, and generating that feeling of thrill & noir through their words is a skill of few. Christopher Brookmyre brings that thrills back to me in his latest book, The Last Hack which is part of continuing series about a reporter Jack Parlabane.

Before getting into details, let me brief you about the story this book revolves around. Do not worry, no spoilers here. This story is told through the perspectives of Jack and Sam. Two interesting characters with a very different background and set of actions. Sam Morpeth has had to grow up way too fast, left to fend for a younger sister with learning difficulties when their mother goes to prison and watching her dreams of university evaporate.

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Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Thrillers

REVIEW: Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie

I must confess the Hercule Poirot is not one of my favourite detectives. Not even close. But that’s personal opinion. What I enjoy most Poirot’s cases or I must say, Agatha Christie’s writing is the how the cases unfold in the end after reaching the climax. This book has a brilliant ending, that’s all. No spoilers. I enjoy her writing which never fails to create a tension on the reader to get to the end of it. And Then There Were None is the best case scenario.

Continue reading “REVIEW: Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie”

5 Stars, Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Thrillers

BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin

Rebus is back. And he’s not getting old, age seem just a number for him and his creator, Ian Rankin. He’s 21 books old now. Rather Be The Devil is the new entitlement released on November, 3rd. When I heard earlier this year that Ian Rankin has rejected to my request for an interview with for a third time in three years, I thought, ‘Oh Boy! Either I am a pretty bad interviewer or he’s upto something really good. Probably a new Rebus novel. I’ll take that gladly, sir.’

Rebus is into his retirement for almost a couple of years now. But curiosity is a disease and when one’s neurone start sending the type of electrical signals, the giant awakens. Mind gets to work and pulls bits and pieces out of the back of itself. It happens to humans, generally. Nonetheless, Rebus breathe and lives to the extent you can almost smell the cigarette he’s been smoking, but not this time, anyway.

So now you know the process, Rebus mind draws his conscious attention to a cold case from 1970s involving a murder of a female socialite in one of the Edinburgh’s luxurious hotels. An unturned stone for over forty years, and no one was found guilty. Lacking hobbies in his sixties, Rebus, starts up a personal investigation with series of meetings with some old frenemies like Big Ger Cafferty and an ex-cop. Things have already begin to turn nasty in Edinburgh when both DI Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox come across each other once again despite their lack of communication over time to look into those nastier things themselves. Local crime boss and entrepreneur is hurt. Money problems, shell companies, skeletons in the closet and a dangerous mobster hovering over the city of Edinburgh.

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Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

This one certainly one of the most famous Agatha Christie’s crime tale. Whomsoever I am talking with about crime fiction, does bring up Agatha Christie (even if they haven’t read her). The queen of crime as they like to call her, but Hercule Poirot certainly not the king of detectives.

Murder on the Orient Express is a renowned locked room mystery. A locked room mystery, if elaborated is a crime that sounds impossible to ensue. The plot starts on the famous Orient Express train that promises to take her passengers to a journey across the Europe, but is stuck somewhere in between due to heavy snow. Now this is a real incident, an experience the queen of crime has shared with us, her readers from the memorabilia of her life.

This locked room mystery is based on the whole coach of the Orient Express and Hercule Poirot happens to be in that coach. The deed is done, the culprit runs away and Poirot is given the task of bringing the culprit into the spotlight and by deducing his every move, to satisfy his own curiosity as well as the readers of the book. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

Crime and Punishment and Redemption

Redemption. We all seek redemption. Most of us are seeking it from our past self for an idealistic future self in various forms. Writing Crime and Punishment for Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a creative redemption from his past and some of his brother, originally titled The Drunkards. Dostoyevsky became fond of this project and rewrote a version of it from scratch, that we take in our hands today and proudly read.

From the start of the novel, the author accomplishes to decipher that the protagonist, Raskolnikov, is tortured by his own thoughts. A student, as many, poverty-stricken, plans an instantaneous murder of an old pawnbroker, thinking it will delay his poverty for few more weeks, completely ignorant of the aftermath and having minimal self-control. This act of morality follows an aftermath which turns out to be psychological for Raskolnikov and the author spots an absolute scenario of what happens after one stands on the brink of insanity using Raskolnikov as his puppet until the protagonist is bring in contact with his own buried conscience and another sufferer. On the engagement of the book and one’s mind, one will indulge in it actively enough as the plot moves forward.

There is suspense in the novel no doubt. Dostoyevsky, in some amount succeeds in the main theme which he tries to revolve around the story: redemption. Characters like Raskolnikov do have a place in a reader’s mind once they have acquired his attention, for longer period of time. But novels like itself, fails to provide strong reasoning for characters who prove to be a drag thoughtout it. I am not going to name a few, you have to read it and judge it for yourself. My assessment is this, when moving forward the path author wants it to and so does the reader, then why a writer like Dostoyevsky would use elements to create a labyrinth, a maze which has no possible point to prove through the novel and does proves to be unnecessary?
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Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton

This book is for everyone. It is long, the clever sounding plot, full of characters, each one unique and have their own part to play in the story. Set in mid-nineteenth century, it is one of those books to remember for quite a time. The element of murder mystery which is highly anticipated through out the novel might sound regular to some, but it is the the presentation of the mystery that is extraordinary.

When one starts this book, it has a tendency to grab a reader’s attention from the first chapter. Walter Moody is used as a pawn to unfold the mystery that is set in New Zealand goldfields. Thought him a reader is introduced to twelve sophisticated men who have gathered to discuss a secret in which they are all indulged both directly and indirectly. These twelve men are rare characters and is hard to come across such characters in the modern day novels. You might one or two in books written in eighteenth or nineteenth centuries but so many at one place is a rare thing. The secret they share begins with a hermit who is found dead in his cabin, one of the the richest person in town has disappeared, and a local prostitute is found in the middle of a road completely intoxicated.  Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: City of Bones by Michael Connelly

When it comes to cold cases, we love one of them. We, humans, are designed in a way that digging up the past is not only a hobby or an option for some but it is rather an astonishing state of affairs for everyone. Even the crime fiction writers, such as Michael Connelly.

This is though not my first experience with Connelly’s books. Previously, I read his The Lincoln Lawyer which I thought was an average book and looked better on the big screen with tanned up Matthew McConaughey and his southern accent. After getting much annoyed on listening his fans chanting his name through and through, not wanting to turn a Connelly hater but wanting to explore the world of crime fiction, I decided to give Harry Bosch a chance this time.

Detective Harry Bosch come across a twenty year old murder case, when the bones of a twelve-year-old boy are found and scattered in Hollywood Hills, Bosch’s own territory. With media attending already on the case, the pressure on Bosh grows as he uncovers the story and life of the dead boy. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: City of Bones by Michael Connelly”

Book List, Crime & Mystery

5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015

I love reading Crime Fiction novels. They are intriguing, a dynamic pace is maintained by most of the authors in their works and they are often surprising.

Hanging Garden is Rankin’s complete novel and is 9th John Rebus novel, and becomes more fascinating.

My Rating 5 out of 5!

It’s winter and what will be better, if not be in Russia. At least Tom Rob Smith’s Child 44 can take us there. Stalin’s Soviet Union, a paradise in books but not in reality. This thrilling novel is the first of Leo Demidov’s trilogy.

My Rating: 4 out of 5  

Another gripping novel, full of thrill and after reading it, there will be some amount of adrenaline rush left inside you. Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

My Rating 4 out of 5 Continue reading “5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin

There are few authors who after becoming bestsellers keep on improving as a writer. With them, their characters grow, their stories become unforgettable and its a bliss for the readers. Rankin is one of them. After he got his hard work paid of with the publishing of Black and Blue in 1997 rewarding him Crime Writers’ Association’s Gold Dagger for best crime novel. Since then,  having reading almost every novel written by Rankin that includes his creation of John Rebus, a Detective Inspector who is known for bending rules, and getting the cases he is assigned, under his skin.

Standing in Another Man’s Grave, came three years back and is listed as the 18th book in John Rebus series. It is also a book that brings back John Rebus from retirement, brings back another interesting, twisted crime full of lies and real-life characters. And of course, John Rebus’ own demons. Many of the Rebus fans are interested in that. Few are more curious about his demons than of the crime solved by him.

This book is one of the major leap in the life John Rebus, if he has been made of flesh and bone rather than by Rankin’s imagination. It brings Rebus back to life. He has become old as his Saab, officially not a cop anymore, working for the SCRU department under CID as a semi-official investigator, handling cold cases, cases which are still unsolved, has cut his boozing, has cut his smoking, but not at all rusty. Ghosts of the past such as Big Ger Cafferty a semi-retired gangster who in his prime use to run Edinburgh, are still mingling with Rebus. They occasionally patch for a drink, but Rebus consider him nothing more than a ghost from his own past. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin”