Books, eReaders

A Curated list of Kindle/Ereaders posts from this blog

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I remember when I read my first ebook on a mobile phone, it was not so smart like nowadays phones, the glowing screen in the darkness of night made me interested in books to a higher extent to continue both the habits of reading and eReading. Years, have passed since that night and now I own a smartphone and a personal eReader as well. My appetite of reading books has grown over the years and to satisfy it, both the formats: physical and electronic, have helped me. Some might not agree with me over ebooks and few might still be indulged in the Battle of Physical Books vs E-Books. But I must say, after all, it’s a matter of choice and opinion. You can stick with books that have an aroma inside them that cannot or haven’t (as to my knowledge) been converted in a saleable fragrance. Or you can get best of both the worlds.

Continue reading “A Curated list of Kindle/Ereaders posts from this blog”

Books, eReaders, Graphic Novels

Read Graphic Novels on a Kindle

Reading Graphic Novels on a computer is awesome but you can read them on a eye-friendly-screen such as your Kindle. In some steps you can make it happen.

The process of converting a graphic novel to be able to read it on a Kindle is simple. Graphic novel files are either in CBZ or CBR format and you use Calibre (an ebook manager), and convert them to MOBI format and then copy the file to your Kindle.

Continue reading “Read Graphic Novels on a Kindle”

Books, eReaders, Guest Post

GUEST POST: Do E-books Allow Us to Read Books Properly?

Do E-books Allow Us to Read Books Properly? by Cassie

The popularity of e-books has grown over the years. It’s no surprise why e-readers have taken off. You can store thousands of books on a single, easy-to-carry device. Top authors now offer both print and digital versions of their novels. Interestingly, paperback sales have increased by 2.5 percent in 2015. In comparison, e-book sales actually dipped 11.1 percent. With that said, many readers have no qualms reading either format. Still there are a few who strongly prefer one over the other. Perhaps you are a die-hard paperback supporter. Or maybe you prefer the digital format. Whichever you prefer, there are definitely positives and negatives of e-books.

 

Advantages of E-books

There’s no doubt e-books have changed the way people read, both good and bad. On the plus side, the average e-book reader has read more books in the past year than those who only read print. Readers can place digital books on their smartphones or tablets and read anywhere, whether they’re waiting in line or relaxing on the beach. Thanks to the open environment of Amazon and Barnes and Noble, there are thousands of original e-books users might not otherwise find at their bookstore. Bibliophiles can even get access to books not available in their country by using virtual private network (VPN) software to work around geo-restrictions.

One of the biggest advantages of e-books over traditional ones is the ability to customize font size, style and even darkness. This makes it perfect for people with poor eyesight or reading disorders. A study found dyslexic subjects managed much better with e-books as they were able to format text so they only needed to focus on a single line at a time.

Studies also suggest e-readers boost reading confidence among reluctant young readers as they are more familiar with the technology. Since they cannot see the size of the book, it is visually less daunting to read a 300-page e-book than a physical book of the same size. Since many e-readers come with a built-in dictionary, those with lower reading comprehension or ESL readers can quickly learn the meaning of words in context without having to open a separate dictionary.

Disadvantages of E-books

All of these might seem like e-books improve our reading capabilities. It certainly has made reading a popular pastime again. However, it comes with its own set of drawbacks. One of the biggest is in recollection. A 2014 study found e-book readers recalled order of events worse than those who read a print version of the same story. The same study found readers were not as emotionally invested in stories when reading digital versus paperback. While it’s unclear why this might be, researchers suggest it might be due to the lack of tactile feedback. With a physical book, readers must physically turn a page and can see their progress as the pages increase on the left side and decrease on the right.

Other researchers suggest a more straightforward reason: shorter reading time. This is especially true when not reading on a dedicated e-reader. There are so many distractions that direct people’s attention away from the book, whether it’s getting a notification about an email or simply browsing the web. People are so used to multitasking with their smartphones and tablets, this habit carries over when reading.

Even when reading without distractions, the amount of time people spend reading a book has decreased. Before e-readers, many people set aside a few hours to read a book. It provided a relaxing experience or routine to help break up a hectic day. Now, many people read books on the go. Instead of hours, they often read books in fifteen to 30-minute bursts in order to fill time. Unfortunately, this leads to poorer reading comprehension and information retention, both of which require long, undisturbed chunks of time.

In addition, many e-book readers tend to skim and hunt for important words or phrases in an F pattern, a habit carried over from reading webpages. While this might provide the basic idea of the action on page, it leaves out a lot of detail. Interestingly, while skimming certainly occurs with physical books, it’s more common with digital. This might be due to the fact that reading on-screen takes 20 to 30 percent longer than reading on paper. Digital readers could be making up for lost time when reading on-screen.

One reason many people approach digital reading habits more casually than regular books is the concept of ownership. When readers buy a physical book they own it. Once exchanged for money, publishers or authors cannot force readers to give up their copy. On the other hand, readers do not own digital books. Instead, they purchase a license for the text. This means the provider—Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc.—controls the book and can otherwise revoke access or simply remove it from devices. If providers can pull books off a device at will, it might not make much sense to many readers to get too invested.

The question of whether e-books are good or bad for our reading habits has supporters on both sides. At the end of the day, it depends on the reader. Some may find their reading habits improve while others might find their comprehension decrease due to distractions. One thing is clear: digital books won’t replace physical books anytime soon. The world will continue to offer paper and pixels for book lovers around the world.


About the Author: Cassie is a technology and entertainment writer. An avid reader, she’s intrigued by how technological advances have made reading more accessible for many while also creating several disadvantages. 

Follow her on Twitter.   

 

Books, eReaders

Merits of Reading (e)Books

Source: Tor.com

Having a book to read on the fly is a wonderful advantage that an ebook reading application or an eReader provides. In this digital age, we are doing it wrong if we are mingling with thought of “Ebooks vs Books” paradigm. There is no debate, there is no question in that. If we want to read, we must read. Ebooks can be read practically anywhere on anything whether you have a phone, a tablet or a laptop (However, I don’t like reading “books” on my laptop) or an eReader.

The argument of Ebooks vs. Books is wrongly build, since a physical copy of a book is always and will always be an ideal format. The feeling of holding a book and grasping lines after lines with your eyes might be indispensable but to satisfy our thirst of reading it is up to us on how we can take advantage of both formats in our daily lives.

Source: Cyanide & Happiness

I am an avid reader and most of the books that I read are in Ebook format. I am always carrying my smartphone and there are tons of applications that support the common formats like .epub or .mobi. Most apps even offer customisations according the day/night light and the background paper just to ease the stress on your eyes. Most apps do provide an average text-to-speech feature which works great when you want to give your eyes some rest.

Continue reading “Merits of Reading (e)Books”

eReaders, Essay

Reading books in the Digital Age

I’d like to thank you guys for sharing your experiences with reading ebooks on your e-readers in the post, Buying an EReader, Worth? Two weeks back, after taking in full consideration that an e-reader will be good for me, I finally got my hands on Kindle Paperwhite 2015. It’s good, lightweight, lighter than my smart phone. Reading continuously for hours, doesn’t strain my eyes any more and I am very glad with features distraction free-reading. No more email or messages to interrupt me if I am reaching a climax of some mystery.Twitter113961e

There are a lot of free ebooks available on websites like Project Gutenberg. Then there is an option for NetGalley lovers, to send the books they have been approved of, directly to their Kindle(s). Having multiple dictionaries on the go is a good option. Battery life is good, haven’t really tested it. The testing part is still in progress but I have read five books on it since the day I have bought it and got it fully charged before doing any reading and the battery bar is still there, hanging around 20 to 25 percent.

Another feature that fascinate me is the “Reading Time”. The device calculates the reading speed, taking into account, how many words you read in a minute which may vary depending on the complexity of the text, (like reading Milton’s Lost Paradise or Dante’s The Divine Comedy) but there is an average that it will continue to do so. If the book is in Kindle Format, that is azw/azw3 or DRM free like mobi, it will show the time remaining in completing the chapter and the book separately along with amount of book you have read in percentage.  Continue reading “Reading books in the Digital Age”

Books, eReaders

Buying an EReader, Worth?

I am too fond of reading books in an electronic format. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, Hermen Hesse’s Siddhartha, My Inventions by Nikola Tesla, and A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking are some of the books I have managed to read on my smartphone using an ereader application this month. I have been in the habit of reading books on a smartphone since my teenage days and I find it quite portable and accessible at the same time. Major reason being I am carrying my phone almost everywhere and when I get time, I can sneak in a chapter or two anytime.

In recent days I have been thinking of buying an E-Reader, a proper one. The reason being is that, since I have started working, I have developed this habit of checking emails, getting notifications and checking them at the moment and these things usually leads to a distraction and many a times I lose my focus over the text. It is happening in a vigorous frequency in past six months such that I am unable to cope with my reading time. I have tried putting my phone on airplane mode, but since it is the only mean of communication I have, I have realised that I cannot do that for more than an hour a day. Anyone’s calling at any time and there is something to lose sometimes.  Continue reading “Buying an EReader, Worth?”

Books, eReaders

Best MOBILE Reading APPS

Many of us readers use mobile devices to read as these devices are getting smarter everyday. I am a avid reader, and read half of my books on a 6 inch screen device. I remember, in my teenage days, often spending pocket money beforehand instead of buying books, and being read most of the books of the school library, in curiosity and being driven mad by the love of books, I discovered a new way (new for me it was, being sixteen and finding ways to stabilize my teenage moods) to satisfy those cravings of a readaholic on a mobile device. A  PDA- HTC P3400i recently gifted by my parents on my birthday, I spend my last teenage years staring down that 3 inch screen all day long and exploring new worlds with that small device. I had other uses of it too but they seem little on front of reading books.

Reading eBooks has become an essential part of their generous habit and those who prefer mobility with their ongoing passion. Technology tries to compete with the speed of light, and due that competitiveness the outcomes are sweet for us. With the advance in the technology the devices we use are becoming smarter and each device tries to provide a desirable experience to the user. Reading eBooks is not behind in that course, not only mobile devices are preferable but devices with a bigger screen yet handy such as tablets have become popular. Number of applications are enormous for these devices for reading books but a few are adequate for every reader.

Kindle, Available for iOS/Android/Windows Phone 7+

Continue reading “Best MOBILE Reading APPS”