REVIEW: Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie

I must confess the Hercule Poirot is not one of my favourite detectives. Not even close. But that’s personal opinion. What I enjoy most Poirot’s cases or I must say, Agatha Christie’s writing is the how the cases unfold in the end after reaching the climax. This book has a brilliant ending, that’s all. No spoilers. I enjoy her writing which never fails to create a tension on the reader to get to the end of it. And Then There Were None is the best case scenario.

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Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in February 2017

Will 2017 be the year we finally get our hands on The Winds of Winter? I am eagerly waiting for it and I am sure you excited too. Thus, while we both wait for George R. R. Martin to finally disagree with Game of Thrones TV show’s producers and to show gratitude towards the thirst of his fans and readers, we still have plenty to read and crave for in particular genre of science fiction as well as fantasy.

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Top Fiction Books I Read in 2016

Once again, I am offering you a number of books I enjoyed reading last year in a broader sense of a genre: Fiction.

Stoner by John Williams

A fascinating, fast, elegant read. William Stoner and we all have something in common.

Read Full Review

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BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin

Rebus is back. And he’s not getting old, age seem just a number for him and his creator, Ian Rankin. He’s 21 books old now. Rather Be The Devil is the new entitlement released on November, 3rd. When I heard earlier this year that Ian Rankin has rejected to my request for an interview with for a third time in three years, I thought, ‘Oh Boy! Either I am a pretty bad interviewer or he’s upto something really good. Probably a new Rebus novel. I’ll take that gladly, sir.’

Rebus is into his retirement for almost a couple of years now. But curiosity is a disease and when one’s neurone start sending the type of electrical signals, the giant awakens. Mind gets to work and pulls bits and pieces out of the back of itself. It happens to humans, generally. Nonetheless, Rebus breathe and lives to the extent you can almost smell the cigarette he’s been smoking, but not this time, anyway.

So now you know the process, Rebus mind draws his conscious attention to a cold case from 1970s involving a murder of a female socialite in one of the Edinburgh’s luxurious hotels. An unturned stone for over forty years, and no one was found guilty. Lacking hobbies in his sixties, Rebus, starts up a personal investigation with series of meetings with some old frenemies like Big Ger Cafferty and an ex-cop. Things have already begin to turn nasty in Edinburgh when both DI Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox come across each other once again despite their lack of communication over time to look into those nastier things themselves. Local crime boss and entrepreneur is hurt. Money problems, shell companies, skeletons in the closet and a dangerous mobster hovering over the city of Edinburgh.

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REVIEW: Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

I must confess I have never read any book of the Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. And for the time being I cannot confirm to do so. Though I am familiar with Neil Gaiman’s writing which sometimes fascinates me. Coraline and Sandman series are a good place to start with Neil Gaiman, only if you are unfamiliar.

Good Omens is a collaborative work and unlike any other co-authored books (I am pointing to Patterson and Co.), it’s different and points out some good things about society and religion in general. Overall, this book is a piece of fantasy and show signs of humour from the start.

One, if highly familiar with both Gaiman’s and Pratchett’s style of writing might able to point out tiny bit of difference in the text but I think it is not much of a difference. The plot consists of angels and demons, good and evil and a tale of bonding between the two. The demon as we may call some of them, are not different and nor are the angels. In the start, a funny thing happens that develops the whole book and plot revolves around that part.

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BOOK REVIEW: Secrets of Zyanpagua- Return of the Princess by Illika Ranjan

Secrets of Zynpagua: Return of the Princess by Ilika Ranjan was a fun read for me. The book is meant for children or early teenagers and in their perspective it is quite a good read. It has all elements of a children’s book and I would to has more than the elements.

The book is about Zyanpagua, a fantasy land separated from Earth where an evil king regulates who has captured the queen of Zyanpagua with his magic and has vanished the king, again with the help of his magic whom he calls violet. The princess, the daughter of the original queen, the protagonist of this story, resides in India and is unknown of the fact of her being the princess or the existence of Zyanpagua when she is introduced to her readers.

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What did I read this week?

Current week is to an end and I am still not finished with Wilkie Collins’ WOMAN IN WHITE. Many say it’s his masterpiece but I am reading Collins for the first time and not even a hundred pages complete. It’s a mystery novel and has a Gothic theme with psychological realism which I am yet to explore. More this week, I had more than usual amount of free time and the amount of books I have to read is always, enormous. Thus to take the matter in my own hands and with blessings of time, I decided to binge reading and ended up reading first two books of Lord Peter Wimsey, Whose Body? & Clouds of Witness written by Dorothy Sayers.

               

Lord Peter Wimsey, as I like to imagine, is an unusual sort of character to be a detective in detective fiction with his reputation in London’s Society and the wealth of his family.

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