BOOK REVIEW: Fearless and Free by Wendy Sachs

Published by Amacom Books | My Rating: 4/5

Often these days we see books with catchy covers that are entitled to one half of our species. Then many of us from the other half disown the notion of reading that book even though we know that it will do good to us, we will gather some better thoughts for our intellectual and conscience from that book. There isn’t any gender gap at start when we are naive. It’s a seed sown inside our heads. This is what we teach and preach from then on and that’s how our children begin to differ. And then it becomes a problem.

Both women and men are human beings. One species! How can someone differentiate between the workings of the two? I tell you to disown the “disowning notion” right now. Start it today. Start by reading some books like Wendy Sachs’s Fearless and Free: How Smart Women pivot & relaunch their careers.

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Top Non Fiction Books I read in 2016 Part 2

Hola! Welcome back to “Read in 2016” series of posts. I am glad you read the first post in the series in which I suggest you Top Non-Fiction Books I read this year, irrespective of their publication date. As, in the previous post, I discussed by motive to come out with these book lists is that to make your TBR list for next year, a bit heavy. So, I hope you are ready for some more titles. If you haven’t read the post go and read it here.

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REVIEW: Small Steps to Big Reading- Converting Non-Readers Into Readers by Hozefa Bhinderwala

My Rating: 3/5

Small Steps to Big Reading written by Dr. Hozefa Bhinderwala intend towards non-regular readers with illustrations and motivational tips and answering “how” & “why” questions non-readers often tend to ask, to spend an amount of time with a book. The title is self-explanotry. Bhinderwala suggests giving up some deeply entrenched old habits that are counterproductive and equipping ourselves with better skills.

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BOOK REVIEW: Mastery by Robert Greene 

For a start, I want you to watch this video:

No, I did not watch this video before reading Mastery by Robert Greene book. Though I do watched it after reading the book and it made me read the book again and get deep into it. Malkhaz has elegantly and importantly described the whole 310 pages long book in almost 13 minutes and if you are not going to read this post, at least watch the video. You’ll definitely learn something new. If you decide to read this post, keep in my mind that I’m only writing about this book is because I enjoyed reading it and simply want to share my thoughts on it.

I was first introduced to Robert Greene’s works in 48 Laws of Power when I saw that red binding, vertical blue stripe in the middle of the cover in a local bookstore. I had a series of thoughts in parallel and some of them were extreme and exciting. After reading a few pages, he become my company for the next few days, especially morning and night. Not many books do I enjoy reading in the morning, but I can say Robert Greene’s writing is definitely the one to be enjoyed in the morning bliss. Wake up, get yourself together and Greene’s words will help to get hold of yourself for the rest of the day.

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Top NonFiction Books I Read in 2016 Part 1

As this year is closing down, I have decided to produce some lists under the title “Read in 2016” for you such that would have more trouble managing your TBR lists next year (*grin*). More titles to add to you to-read lists. Well that’s the whole intention of all book lists such as the Top Tens, and the Top Fives, of the year, to introduce you to books that , are the chances, you might have not read and I will try every ounce to convince to at least take look at the titles over Goodreads.com or Amazon and may be, add to your wishlist/TBR/to-read list.

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BOOK REVIEW: Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

This book is a great introduction to start on the matter of educating yourself in terms of “money”. This is the message Robert Kiyosaki wants to convey in this 200 pages long book.

This book isn’t about money, it is about how we think and are taught to think from an early age about money and not in terms of money. Education brings wisdom in a person but to be educated in terms of money or in Kiyosaki’s words, being “financially literate” is an important aspect of how we are going to solve the money problems we face everyday and for the rest of our lives. Working hard, keeping our day jobs at bay is an effort we all try to make but only to pay bills. Kiyosaki explains the difference between assets and liabilities and how apart from paying bills, we can earn money in longer terms and for better future.

Kiyosaki addresses his two fathers in this book, one who is highly educated in terms of academia, and the other is educated in terms of being wealthy and making “money work for him”. One father advises him on to get a college degree and get a job that is secured and other puts emphasis on being learning how money, market, and related terminology like accounting works. In other terms getting little knowledge of how everything is part of the same cycle and you must how that cycle runs otherwise being unfamiliar with one section of that cycle can harm you in long term. In his simple narrative, the author compares both aspects by narrating stories that include both his fathers and what suggestions they gave him and how he draw his own conclusions and his emphasis on where he combine best of both the worlds.

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How to Read a Book?

If you are reading this post, then you are certain about the importance of ‘reading’.

To acquire knowledge with aim of increasing one’s understanding, is reading enough? The answer is yes, but the question remains, how?

We need to think about how we read and Mortimer Adler’s How to Read a Book is a perfect place to start with. Published in 1940, it immediately became a bestseller, and since that time the book has been updated many times, famously and notably by Charles van Doren in the 1970’s.

Most of the times, we think reading is something that you can do or you cannot – that is you can either read or not. The truth, however, is that reading is a skill that can be improved with knowledge and practice.

The goal of reading determines how you read. If you’re reading for entertainment, you’re going to read a lot differently and likely different material than if you’re reading to increase understanding. There’s nothing wrong in reading for entertainment but ask yourself, are you really learning anything new? Continue reading “How to Read a Book?”