Book List, Books, Fiction, science fiction

Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in March 2017

Chalk by Paul Cornell

Continue reading “Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in March 2017”

Book List, Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, science fiction

Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in February 2017

Will 2017 be the year we finally get our hands on The Winds of Winter? I am eagerly waiting for it and I am sure you excited too. Thus, while we both wait for George R. R. Martin to finally disagree with Game of Thrones TV show’s producers and to show gratitude towards the thirst of his fans and readers, we still have plenty to read and crave for in particular genre of science fiction as well as fantasy.

Continue reading “Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read in February 2017”

Book List, Books, Fiction, science fiction

4 CyberPunk Books To Read

Cyberpunk first came into existence around late 1970s. This particular type of genre share its boundaries with science-fiction from the start and hasn’t shy away from development during the time. In terms of books, these are titles you should take look:

Neuromancer by William Gibson

Artificial Intelligence in 1980s. Computer who can think and communicate with human beings as well as manipulate them in doing stuff. The story has cyberspace, data-thieves, samurai, assassins. This is 1980s we are talking about.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

This book was first published in 1968 and is still ahead of time. It’s an important piece for the type of genre.

Continue reading “4 CyberPunk Books To Read”

Book Reviews, Books, Reviews, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Code of Manavas by Arpit Bakshi

Seldom do I come across a Science Fiction book that is based completely swoops Indian Mythology. The Code of Manavas: Beyond the Realm by Arpit Bakshi is the one I recently came across that talks about Indian Mythology and Science Fiction at the same time. It’s a task that has to be stir considerably for a reader to digest the mix. There are books in which mixing mythology with fantasy/science fiction is not done with considerable amount. A reader might feel something or the other lacks. The amount of lack does create an imbalance in a reader’s mind.

However, Arpit Bakshi’s book does not fails to create that imbalance. He does a good job there. The plot follows a young protagonist Krishna, who is a scientist and the founder of Bhoomidium, an organic compound which is helping Bhooma, the only remaining land on the whole planet, to survive. This organic material is a healing source but has effects on humans and turning them into powerful beings a.k.a. Manavas. Everything has its price which is irrelevant to time. The organic material cannot stop the geological changes whose occurrences is what Bhoomidium is the outcome. Thus remains possibility of leaving as an alternative solution. The question remains, how? Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Code of Manavas by Arpit Bakshi”

Book List, Books, science fiction

5 SFF Books You Have To Read This Year

The world of science fiction and fantasy is booming and I came across many titles on the internet in the specific genre(s) but only few grabbed my attention.

This Census-Taker by China Miéville

Blurb:  After witnessing a profoundly traumatic event, a boy is left alone in a remote house on a hilltop with his increasingly deranged parent. When a stranger knocks on his door, the boy senses that his days of isolation are over—but by what authority does this man keep the meticulous records he carries? Is he the boy’s friend? His enemy? Or something altogether other?

Arcadia by Ian Pears

Blurb: Henry Lytten – a spy turned academic and writer – sits at his desk in Oxford in 1962, dreaming of other worlds. He embarks on the story of Jay, an eleven-year-old boy who has grown up within the embrace of his family in a rural, peaceful world – a kind of Arcadia. But when a supernatural vision causes Jay to question the rules of his world, he is launched on a life-changing journey. Lytten also imagines a different society, highly regulated and dominated by technology, which is trying to master the science of time travel. Meanwhile – in the real world – one of Lytten’s former intelligence colleagues tracks him down for one last assignment. As he and his characters struggle with questions of free will, love, duty and the power of the imagination, Lytten discovers he is not sure how he wants his stories to end, nor even who is imaginary… 

Continue reading “5 SFF Books You Have To Read This Year”

Books, Reviews, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Enterprise by Vonda N. McIntyre

Enterprise: The First Adventure is a part of the Star Trek: The Original Series. Star Trek is a fascinating world of its own. Like our world, it represents it consists interesting cultural diversity with characters like Spock who is as emotionally stable as a rock.

Enterprise:The First Adventure is the book about the first time captain James T. Kirk, the youngest man to be promoted to the rank of captain in Federation history. He takes of the Enterprise for the first time. Spock, Sulu, Scotty, and Janice Rand are among some other characters who try to adjust to their new captain and are introduced as it is really the beginning.

The author Vonda McIntyre makes the story interesting, by her steady narration. The plot drives forward as the characters get indulge with themselves. Te science fiction thing is limited in this book to general Star Trek SciFi stuff. The story focuses on the crew as they put aside their differences when a monstrous starship appears on their nascent flight path. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Enterprise by Vonda N. McIntyre”

Books, Reviews, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Spock Must Die! by James Blish

Spock Must Die by James Blish is the first book in the Star Trek Adventure series originally published by Bantam. The world of Star Trek is humongous. There are different series in which this enormous world is divided. For a week I was confused to start reading which series or any particular book. My previous knowledge of Star Trek world is limited to the two movies which have came lately and are directed by J. J. Abrams. I know what an enterprise is, I knew the main characters and of course the Klingon race. I haven’t watched the original telly shows but I was confident enough to start an expedition.

The first original Star Trek novel was published by James Blish in 1970, Spock Must Die. My experience with science fiction is limited and I have read some Star Wars books before. One thing I did not like about Star Wars is that the story is limited only to the adventure which star wars try to possess, the story of the twins, the father-son relationship. What I mean to say is that there is little science in that fiction. I think it should be considered more of a fantasy series and less of science fiction. One excellent reason to read Star Trek is that a reader will find similarities to metaphysical quandaries and concepts of physics and philosophy at the same time. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Spock Must Die! by James Blish”

Books, classics, Fiction, Reviews, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

Herbert George Wells starts the book THE TIME MACHINE by arguing that the ‘Time’ is itself a separate dimension. Through the protagonist of the book, Wells present a theory that the first three dimensions are occupied by the space and the time is the fourth dimension. Just like the narrator of the book, as a reader of the text, I felt eccentric while coming across the aforementioned theory of Mr. Herbert G. Wells.

In the book, an unnamed narrator tells the story of a time traveller whom he met and who then takes over the narration to describe about an event that happened to him. The Time Machine is all about imagination. Both of the person who wrote it, and the person who reads it. Wells’ Time Traveller takes a reader 800,000 years beyond his own era where he discovers two bizarre races—the ethereal Eloi and the subterranean Morlocks—who not only symbolize the duality of human nature, but offer a terrifying portrait of the men of tomorrow as well. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Time Machine by H. G. Wells”

Books, Fiction, Reviews, science fiction

Book Review: Doctor Who and The Daleks by David Whitaker

My past reading experience with Doctor Who books hasn’t been good (see Book Reviews Archive to read reviews of other Doctor Who Books). Though, Doctor Who and The Daleks is not one of them. I recently found a copy of this book, residing in the last row of my book shelf. I don’t remember when did I buy it but I feel happy that I have one.

Doctor Who and the Daleks by David Whitaker is the fist ever novelisation of a Doctor Who television story, first published in 1964, original script written by Terry Nation. I consider myself a Whovian and I my favourite Doctor is the tenth one.

This book is written in first person, narrated through out by Ian Chesterton who with Barbara Wright accompanies Doctor Who ad his granddaughter, Susan, to the planet Skaro, unknowingly, in a time machine  and spacecraft called the TARDIS which stands for Time and Relative Dimension in Space. The first person narration is what that will attract a reader and worked for me as well. I am not that well-versed in early Doctors but I felt comfortable with the characters. I can say, all characters are well-written.  Continue reading “Book Review: Doctor Who and The Daleks by David Whitaker”

Books, Fiction, Reviews, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy by Douglas Adams

In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide, #1)The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is a fun, buoyant adventure following the tale of Arthur Dent as he narrowly escapes the earth’s destruction in the wake of a new space super-highway being built in its place, hitching a ride with interstellar researcher Ford Prefect aboard the ship of the very alien bureaucrats whom destroyed his planet. From here unfolds the winding and absurdly improbable tale which will take the sole survivor of earth’s destruction from the one side of the galaxy to the end of the universe, stopping along at every time and space in-between.

Light-hearted is probably one of the best ways to describe the main body of the story. The story-line continuously tries to keep a reader’s curiosity, making him wonder what mysteries lies ahead and how humorous can this book get. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy by Douglas Adams”