Ten Poetry Books to Read LIST

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Poetry is an essential part of human life. It’s a combination words in rhythm and we can find rhythm in almost anything we want. These rhythmic descriptions are written in form of poetry. The way a poem soothes human mind, nothing can. Thus, list some poetry books that reflect my personal taste.

The Rime of Ancient Mariner by Samuel T. Coleridge

A lyrical ballad, and one of the longest major poem in English. It relates the events experienced by a mariner who has returned from a long sea voyage. Coleridge  uses narrative techniques such as personification and repetition to create either a sense of danger, of the supernatural or of serenity, depending on the mood of each of the different parts of the poem.

Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair by Pablo Neruda

More than eighty years after its publication, Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair stands as an essential collection that continues to inspire lovers and poets around the world. Continue reading “Ten Poetry Books to Read LIST”

BOOK REVIEW: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

Into the WildInto the Wild by Jon Krakauer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“For a few minutes the roof of the bus remains visible among the stunted trees, a tiny white gleam in a wild green sea, growing smaller and smaller, and then it’s gone.” –Into The Wild

In April 1992, a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless but he liked to call himself ‘Alex Supertramp’.

Before, Christopher McCandless’s story unfolded in these pages, Jon Krakauer wrote an article for Outside magazine from where the initial idea to develop this book came to him.

Six years back, I watched a documentary on the television about the story of Christopher McCandless being made into a movie. The theme of that documentary was the nomadic life an enthusiast traveller, inspired by the beauty of wilderness. The documentary mostly covered the making of the movie using the knowledge about McCandless from Jon Krakauer’s book. But it also showed the fascinating wildness where the nomad McCandless wandered in the April of 1992, towards the escapement by setting himself free from all man-made demons that not only consume our daily life and but whose slaves we really are. Though, this fact I realised after reading the book and not watching the documentary, six years back. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer”

BOOK REVIEW: Inferno by Dante Alighieri

Inferno by Dante Alighieri

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Imagine that feeling, when you are reading a book and by the end it makes you feel complete. We all have observed that by one or the other book(s). Dante’s Divine Comedy: Inferno is one of them. Written almost 700 years ago, it still has the mesmerizing capacity to capture a human’s attention. It’s iconic for a literary work to survive a 700 years and Dante’s work has reached that status: most people at least know of the Inferno, even if they haven’t read it.

Dante’s Inferno, the first third of what has come to be known as the Divine Comedy. Dante himself only referred to it as a Comedy and the “Divine” characterisation was added later. A long poem whose narrative describes what amounts to the poet’s tour of the afterlife. The whole poem is divided into 100 cantos, the Inferno (Hell) has 34, the other two parts– Purgatorio (Purgatory) and Paradiso (Paradise) each have 33. Each canto is written in a form referred to as terza rima, where every three lines rhymes. Getting that rhyming scheme from Italian into English has been one of the major challenges of every translator of the work. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow‘s translation is reasonable to some extent. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Inferno by Dante Alighieri”

BOOK REVIEW: The Entire Predicament by Lucy Corin

It’s an impressive short-story collection written in a style that is unique and needs your full attention.

I encountered this book on random basis as I was bored of my scheduled reading. Now, I can say that I am quite happy with my choice of random picking. It’s always a risk (whether you would like the book or not) when you choose to read a book at random but that’s the most thrilling part I feel, of this habit. I try to pick random books from time to time to go on with my reading, and explore and experience new sensations inside my head. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Entire Predicament by Lucy Corin”

BOOKS TO READ FROM 90s LIST

The Nineties, I’d like to call it my time for I was born in the early nineties. Without any knowledge of what books are, I am sure I wouldn’t have thought at that time on turning into as a voracious reader in next twenty years. Still, I like to call myself the kid from the nineties who love books.

Here are some great titles published during the decade:

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, 1990

Fifteen years after, I was amazed on finding that dinosaurs can exist on-screen. Five years down the line, I was again amazed to find that you could write a book that was a thriller and had science. 

American Psycho by Bret E. Ellis, 1991

One might say, my teenage days were ruined by reading these kind of books. Well I’d defend by saying they were essential part of my conscience both as a reader and as a human. This book made me familiar with lots of stuff that a boy at the age of sixteen could not even imagine.  Continue reading “BOOKS TO READ FROM 90s LIST”

BOOK REVIEW: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy by Douglas Adams

In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide, #1)The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is a fun, buoyant adventure following the tale of Arthur Dent as he narrowly escapes the earth’s destruction in the wake of a new space super-highway being built in its place, hitching a ride with interstellar researcher Ford Prefect aboard the ship of the very alien bureaucrats whom destroyed his planet. From here unfolds the winding and absurdly improbable tale which will take the sole survivor of earth’s destruction from the one side of the galaxy to the end of the universe, stopping along at every time and space in-between.

Light-hearted is probably one of the best ways to describe the main body of the story. The story-line continuously tries to keep a reader’s curiosity, making him wonder what mysteries lies ahead and how humorous can this book get. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy by Douglas Adams”

Ernest Hemingway’s reading list for all the Young Writers

In 1934, a young man who wanted to be a writer hitchhiked to Florida to meet his idol, Ernest Hemingway. Only because he read a story by Hemingway in Cosmopolitan, called “One Trip Across”, he traveled all they way from Minnesota to Florida. This young man soon becomes Hemingway’s assistant on a pay a dollar a day. He advised this young man to avoid contemporary writers and compete only with the dead ones whose works have stood the test of time and made him a list of two short stories and fourteen books and handed over to this young man. The list:

  • “The Blue Hotel” by Stephen Crane
  • “The Open Boat” by Stephen Crane
  • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  • Dubliners by James Joyce
  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal
  • Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham
  • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  • Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
  • Hail and Farewell by George Moore
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • The Oxford Book of English Verse
  • The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  • Far Away and Long Ago by W.H. Hudson
  • The American by Henry James

Continue reading “Ernest Hemingway’s reading list for all the Young Writers”