Book Reviews, Books, Business, Non-Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Aha to All in- Life Lessons From an Unexpected Entrepreneur by Jonathan Hagmaier

Pages: 212, Kindle Edition

Published: June 2017

Cover Rating: 2/5

Aha to All in by Jonathan Hagmaier and his co-authors William Long and Jeffrey Smith is not only a memoir of Jonathan’s entrepreneurial phase of life but also contains many lessons that have he struggled and conquered during his journey.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Aha to All in- Life Lessons From an Unexpected Entrepreneur by Jonathan Hagmaier”

Advertisements
Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Psycon by Varun Tejwani

Published: April, 2017

Pages: 236

Cover Rating: 4/5

Goodreads | Amazon

When I picked Varun Tejwani’s new book PSYCON, I was amazed by how simple yet curiosity arousing cover filled with darkness. Cover does play an important role in attracting a reader towards the book and conveys the message before any page is flip. I expected the same with the plot of this book.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Psycon by Varun Tejwani”

Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Is it the last Call? by Tarak Koley

Published: 2017

Pages: 198, Paperback

Cover Rating: 5/5

Goodreads | Amazon

Abir a fickle-minded, aimless guy comes in acquaintance with Sunanda through facebook. Sunanda is totally different by nature from Abir. After spending few days in facebook they fall in love in spite of their social barrier. As Sunanda has never revealed her face before meeting to each other, Abir becomes speechless when he meet with her first time after two months of their relationship. Abir turns into a different guy, he starts to quit all his bad habit for the benefit of his relationship.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Is it the last Call? by Tarak Koley”

Books, eReaders

TECH WON’T KILL YOUR READING

Books are a collection of words that form a unified narrative, and printed on paper. These kind of objects are very alive today, and will continue to exist when you’ll be having grandchildren. They are one of the best inventions.

Ebooks are a collection of words that too form a unified narrative but are not printed on paper. Instead they are distributed electronically in various formats for vast amount of devices. Soon you’d be able to read ebooks on those wearable smart watches. If that doesn’t damage your eyes, nothing will. Apart from that, they are one of the best innovations. They are here for the benefit. It’s up to the reader to take full advantage of the technology for their benefit and love of reading.

Continue reading “TECH WON’T KILL YOUR READING”

Book Reviews, Books, Graphic Novels, Non-Fiction

REVIEW: Maus – My Father Bleeds History

I picked this book on a friend’s recommendation and I must say, while reading it, I could not put it down. Maus is a two part series graphic novel written by American cartoonist and contributing artist for The New YorkerArt Spiegelman. It’s also a memoir as well as an autobiographical work.

After reading it, I was surprised how much I enjoyed this graphic novel. There is a uniqueness to the concept and the how it is illustrated with story telling. Art Spiegelman has done a great job with story telling, I must say. The illustration or the graphical part is an excellent addition to decipher the incidents or certain scenarios the author wants the reader to focus on.

Continue reading “REVIEW: Maus – My Father Bleeds History”

Books, eReaders, Guest Post

GUEST POST: Do E-books Allow Us to Read Books Properly?

Do E-books Allow Us to Read Books Properly? by Cassie

The popularity of e-books has grown over the years. It’s no surprise why e-readers have taken off. You can store thousands of books on a single, easy-to-carry device. Top authors now offer both print and digital versions of their novels. Interestingly, paperback sales have increased by 2.5 percent in 2015. In comparison, e-book sales actually dipped 11.1 percent. With that said, many readers have no qualms reading either format. Still there are a few who strongly prefer one over the other. Perhaps you are a die-hard paperback supporter. Or maybe you prefer the digital format. Whichever you prefer, there are definitely positives and negatives of e-books.

 

Advantages of E-books

There’s no doubt e-books have changed the way people read, both good and bad. On the plus side, the average e-book reader has read more books in the past year than those who only read print. Readers can place digital books on their smartphones or tablets and read anywhere, whether they’re waiting in line or relaxing on the beach. Thanks to the open environment of Amazon and Barnes and Noble, there are thousands of original e-books users might not otherwise find at their bookstore. Bibliophiles can even get access to books not available in their country by using virtual private network (VPN) software to work around geo-restrictions.

One of the biggest advantages of e-books over traditional ones is the ability to customize font size, style and even darkness. This makes it perfect for people with poor eyesight or reading disorders. A study found dyslexic subjects managed much better with e-books as they were able to format text so they only needed to focus on a single line at a time.

Studies also suggest e-readers boost reading confidence among reluctant young readers as they are more familiar with the technology. Since they cannot see the size of the book, it is visually less daunting to read a 300-page e-book than a physical book of the same size. Since many e-readers come with a built-in dictionary, those with lower reading comprehension or ESL readers can quickly learn the meaning of words in context without having to open a separate dictionary.

Disadvantages of E-books

All of these might seem like e-books improve our reading capabilities. It certainly has made reading a popular pastime again. However, it comes with its own set of drawbacks. One of the biggest is in recollection. A 2014 study found e-book readers recalled order of events worse than those who read a print version of the same story. The same study found readers were not as emotionally invested in stories when reading digital versus paperback. While it’s unclear why this might be, researchers suggest it might be due to the lack of tactile feedback. With a physical book, readers must physically turn a page and can see their progress as the pages increase on the left side and decrease on the right.

Other researchers suggest a more straightforward reason: shorter reading time. This is especially true when not reading on a dedicated e-reader. There are so many distractions that direct people’s attention away from the book, whether it’s getting a notification about an email or simply browsing the web. People are so used to multitasking with their smartphones and tablets, this habit carries over when reading.

Even when reading without distractions, the amount of time people spend reading a book has decreased. Before e-readers, many people set aside a few hours to read a book. It provided a relaxing experience or routine to help break up a hectic day. Now, many people read books on the go. Instead of hours, they often read books in fifteen to 30-minute bursts in order to fill time. Unfortunately, this leads to poorer reading comprehension and information retention, both of which require long, undisturbed chunks of time.

In addition, many e-book readers tend to skim and hunt for important words or phrases in an F pattern, a habit carried over from reading webpages. While this might provide the basic idea of the action on page, it leaves out a lot of detail. Interestingly, while skimming certainly occurs with physical books, it’s more common with digital. This might be due to the fact that reading on-screen takes 20 to 30 percent longer than reading on paper. Digital readers could be making up for lost time when reading on-screen.

One reason many people approach digital reading habits more casually than regular books is the concept of ownership. When readers buy a physical book they own it. Once exchanged for money, publishers or authors cannot force readers to give up their copy. On the other hand, readers do not own digital books. Instead, they purchase a license for the text. This means the provider—Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc.—controls the book and can otherwise revoke access or simply remove it from devices. If providers can pull books off a device at will, it might not make much sense to many readers to get too invested.

The question of whether e-books are good or bad for our reading habits has supporters on both sides. At the end of the day, it depends on the reader. Some may find their reading habits improve while others might find their comprehension decrease due to distractions. One thing is clear: digital books won’t replace physical books anytime soon. The world will continue to offer paper and pixels for book lovers around the world.


About the Author: Cassie is a technology and entertainment writer. An avid reader, she’s intrigued by how technological advances have made reading more accessible for many while also creating several disadvantages. 

Follow her on Twitter.   

 

Books, eReaders

Merits of Reading (e)Books

Source: Tor.com

Having a book to read on the fly is a wonderful advantage that an ebook reading application or an eReader provides. In this digital age, we are doing it wrong if we are mingling with thought of “Ebooks vs Books” paradigm. There is no debate, there is no question in that. If we want to read, we must read. Ebooks can be read practically anywhere on anything whether you have a phone, a tablet or a laptop (However, I don’t like reading “books” on my laptop) or an eReader.

The argument of Ebooks vs. Books is wrongly build, since a physical copy of a book is always and will always be an ideal format. The feeling of holding a book and grasping lines after lines with your eyes might be indispensable but to satisfy our thirst of reading it is up to us on how we can take advantage of both formats in our daily lives.

Source: Cyanide & Happiness

I am an avid reader and most of the books that I read are in Ebook format. I am always carrying my smartphone and there are tons of applications that support the common formats like .epub or .mobi. Most apps even offer customisations according the day/night light and the background paper just to ease the stress on your eyes. Most apps do provide an average text-to-speech feature which works great when you want to give your eyes some rest.

Continue reading “Merits of Reading (e)Books”

Non-Fiction, Reviews

Empower Yourself with Robert Greene

The bestseller 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene is often considered as an evil piece of work, however, the evilness in the book is the reality of the world we are part of. This is how world works and 48 Laws of Power is an understanding, a concise one. Robert Greene certainly help us to improve our understanding of the world better. There’s no harm in that.

Reading this book will definitely increase one’s awareness as he will become more conscious to what and how is it going around. Some of the laws will inspire you as they did to me, towards empowerment of your own and some will help how not to lose that conscious mind in somebody else’s hand. Greene encourages an individual to be fluid in his plans and actions as actions are what matters and not the words.

Focus on the smaller internal changes that lay the groundwork for a much larger change in fortune.  It is the difference between grasping an illusion and emerging yourself in reality, and reality is what will liberate and transform you!- Robert Greene

Continue reading “Empower Yourself with Robert Greene”

5 Stars, Books, classics, Non-Fiction, Reviews, Stoic Philosophy

Meditating with Marcus Aurelius

Writing a review of Meditations is a hard task since there is too much to describe and discuss in one post considering the idle length of a blog post, or of a book review or to have your attention till the end of the post, but it is not enough. I rejected the idea of writing a review before writing this review, several times. But as Marcus Aurelius said:

At dawn, when you have trouble getting out of bed, tell yourself: ‘I have to go to work – as a human being. What do I have to complain of, if I’m going to do what I was born for – the things I was brought into the world to do? Or is this what I was created for? To huddle under the blankets and stay warm?’

Marcus Aurelius was a Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD. He is considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers and what we read today as Meditations is actually a personal notebook written by Marcus, for himself. He divided his work into 12 shorter volumes that comprise today the Meditations. One might question, what to learn from a man who is now a part of wandering dust, who is dead for almost 18 centuries? Wisdom. Wisdom is the crux of life.

In each of the 12 volumes, Marcus’ writing is clear as he describes the virtue of one’s life as a plot that progress as the essence of how universe as a whole works. In his journal, he reminds himself with understanding of universe is recursive in nature.

Everything have always been the same, and recuring, and it makes no difference whether you see the same things recur in a hundred year or two hundred, or in an infinite period.

There is no point in loathing how one’s life is and Marcus writing helps one in endurance. He offers wisdom on how tackle endurance without affecting one’s mental or physical state, constantly reminding us of the solo life we have. From the start of the book, Marcus focuses on the logos, the reasoning, the rational part of our minds, our thoughts our actions, each totally depended on one another. He emphasis the importance of work and discourages the distractions and desires we all have to deal in time. The presence of oneself, the conscious moment, and in that moment he encourages one to be patient and control our actions accordingly. His words shine a beam on the tolerance of nature and how one dislikes, disapproves of another, and reminds us that everyone have faults, thus, one should not concentrate his physical and mental energy on anger.

Continue reading “Meditating with Marcus Aurelius”

eReaders, Essay

Reading books in the Digital Age

I’d like to thank you guys for sharing your experiences with reading ebooks on your e-readers in the post, Buying an EReader, Worth? Two weeks back, after taking in full consideration that an e-reader will be good for me, I finally got my hands on Kindle Paperwhite 2015. It’s good, lightweight, lighter than my smart phone. Reading continuously for hours, doesn’t strain my eyes any more and I am very glad with features distraction free-reading. No more email or messages to interrupt me if I am reaching a climax of some mystery.Twitter113961e

There are a lot of free ebooks available on websites like Project Gutenberg. Then there is an option for NetGalley lovers, to send the books they have been approved of, directly to their Kindle(s). Having multiple dictionaries on the go is a good option. Battery life is good, haven’t really tested it. The testing part is still in progress but I have read five books on it since the day I have bought it and got it fully charged before doing any reading and the battery bar is still there, hanging around 20 to 25 percent.

Another feature that fascinate me is the “Reading Time”. The device calculates the reading speed, taking into account, how many words you read in a minute which may vary depending on the complexity of the text, (like reading Milton’s Lost Paradise or Dante’s The Divine Comedy) but there is an average that it will continue to do so. If the book is in Kindle Format, that is azw/azw3 or DRM free like mobi, it will show the time remaining in completing the chapter and the book separately along with amount of book you have read in percentage.  Continue reading “Reading books in the Digital Age”