5 Stars, Authors, Book List, Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, philosophy, Reviews, Stoic Philosophy

Top Non Fiction Books I read in 2016 Part 2

Hola! Welcome back to “Read in 2016” series of posts. I am glad you read the first post in the series in which I suggest you Top Non-Fiction Books I read this year, irrespective of their publication date. As, in the previous post, I discussed by motive to come out with these book lists is that to make your TBR list for next year, a bit heavy. So, I hope you are ready for some more titles. If you haven’t read the post go and read it here.

Continue reading “Top Non Fiction Books I read in 2016 Part 2”

Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

This book is a great introduction to start on the matter of educating yourself in terms of “money”. This is the message Robert Kiyosaki wants to convey in this 200 pages long book.

This book isn’t about money, it is about how we think and are taught to think from an early age about money and not in terms of money. Education brings wisdom in a person but to be educated in terms of money or in Kiyosaki’s words, being “financially literate” is an important aspect of how we are going to solve the money problems we face everyday and for the rest of our lives. Working hard, keeping our day jobs at bay is an effort we all try to make but only to pay bills. Kiyosaki explains the difference between assets and liabilities and how apart from paying bills, we can earn money in longer terms and for better future.

Kiyosaki addresses his two fathers in this book, one who is highly educated in terms of academia, and the other is educated in terms of being wealthy and making “money work for him”. One father advises him on to get a college degree and get a job that is secured and other puts emphasis on being learning how money, market, and related terminology like accounting works. In other terms getting little knowledge of how everything is part of the same cycle and you must how that cycle runs otherwise being unfamiliar with one section of that cycle can harm you in long term. In his simple narrative, the author compares both aspects by narrating stories that include both his fathers and what suggestions they gave him and how he draw his own conclusions and his emphasis on where he combine best of both the worlds.

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5 Stars, Books, Philosphy, Reviews

REVIEW: Seneca On Anger

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, or Seneca was a philosopher and is best known for his wisdom that may help one to rethink of his own perspectives on life. Seneca was a stoic and during his time embraced Stoicism. He was also an advisor to the Roman Emperor, Nero, in 54 AD. His essays such as On Shortness of Life, and On Anger clearly reflect his contribution to the Stoic philosophy.

Surprisingly, I was never introduced to the word Stoicism before. Not during my school years, nor my college years. I guess, it is my mistake that I was never curious enough to explore, open to ideas such as Stoicism posses, until recently when I first read Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations.

On Anger is a book which is further divided into three books in which Seneca reflects how this passion, this feeling can make us endure for the rest of our lives. He describes anger as an emotion, “and under its possession any human being does remain not humane.” We have all felt anger, on various points. Sometimes it us, many a times it because of the others, we may think. Some follow it is quite pragmatically causing terror that reflect up on the rest of the humanity. Some just want to avenge on the injury they have become a victim to:

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz

Let’s talk about reading books on books. Reading books on books is a constant reminder on why I love to read. Ruined by Reading offers a somewhat a deep insight on why we read and how what we read might shape our lives. It provides an interesting, curiosity arousing introduction to reading variety of books. Also, the title is captivating as well as ironical.

As we grow up and pretend to become more mature, our reading changes with us. The desire to read almost every book still remains but has taken a different form and shape inside me. We understand more, with age, the usefulness of reading a book.

Schwartz’s book reminded me of times when I was indulging myself into this vast world of reading. Schwartz understand and clearly observes that how obsessive are the readers. She then discusses how books have small part, Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz”

Book List

A Half Yearly Reading List

Half of the year has gone, and we have our noses inside the books we are reading and our thoughts mingling around the books we want to read. 2016 has not been so much of a reading year for me as 2015 was. But I have read some good books and few great ones too. Thus, I am compiling a list of books that I have read this year and would like to share with you. Worth taking a look:

Continue reading “A Half Yearly Reading List”

Books, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross

The Calling is the first novel featuring DCI John Luther. Yes, the same Luther you saw on telly as I did, played by Idris Elba. There are so many DC’s and DCI’s the modern British Crime Fiction has produced, so why bother about this one? As usually, he is tortured and that is interesting. Aren’t all?

DCI John Luther has a clearance rate of cases which is extraordinary as it is portrayed by Neil Cross in the telly series too, in the first few episodes. If you have watched the series or/are planning to, you can still read the book. The consequences of this book are what followed by the television series. It’s a prequel.

The plot is simple, John Luther is hunting for a brutal murderer and baby kidnapper who intends to do what he has done again. Now, the most extraordinary thing is there in this simplicity and the credit goes to the author of the book, Neil Cross. The opening scene is do dramatised and there a few more to grab, I feel as if it was a real crime scene in front of me. Every detail is spectacularly written, and very rare in crime fiction novels do you find such generous reception. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross”

Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett

Self-help genre is not for everyone. Especially not for me. Either it is too positive for a dream to come true in man’s life that is unachievable (and for my taste) or it is too boring. But they are a business, in a big business. Dr. Michael Bennet (a psychiatrist) and his daughter/writer Sarah Bennet suggests we are too emotional over self-help books. Actually, not only self-help books, but about everything.

The title of the book, F*ck Feelings: One Shrink’s Practical Advice for Managing All Life’s Impossible Problems, is perfect, and certainly matches the context inside as the book provides some practical solutions to common problems we all face at various times in our lives. The target audience of this book are people who loath self-help books, but I would recommend this to those who love self-help books too. It’s a new insight to very common discussion regarding self-improvement, self-esteem, life’s fairness and unfairness, over helpfulness, serenity or the peace of mind, love, communication, parenthood, assholes, and treatment. It’s about understanding oneself.

This book is about how we over think about every situation as how we let our emotions control our sanity and disrupt our daily/hourly musings. We want to accomplish things that are not pragmatically possible for any living creature, emotionally. I am not saying we should not try for things which many think are cuffed by the word impossible, it’s all about self-control. But try to understand the stuff this books covers and I am talking about are different from the stuff people you are surrounded with may implicitly suggest impossible. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

This one certainly one of the most famous Agatha Christie’s crime tale. Whomsoever I am talking with about crime fiction, does bring up Agatha Christie (even if they haven’t read her). The queen of crime as they like to call her, but Hercule Poirot certainly not the king of detectives.

Murder on the Orient Express is a renowned locked room mystery. A locked room mystery, if elaborated is a crime that sounds impossible to ensue. The plot starts on the famous Orient Express train that promises to take her passengers to a journey across the Europe, but is stuck somewhere in between due to heavy snow. Now this is a real incident, an experience the queen of crime has shared with us, her readers from the memorabilia of her life.

This locked room mystery is based on the whole coach of the Orient Express and Hercule Poirot happens to be in that coach. The deed is done, the culprit runs away and Poirot is given the task of bringing the culprit into the spotlight and by deducing his every move, to satisfy his own curiosity as well as the readers of the book. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

Crime and Punishment and Redemption

Redemption. We all seek redemption. Most of us are seeking it from our past self for an idealistic future self in various forms. Writing Crime and Punishment for Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a creative redemption from his past and some of his brother, originally titled The Drunkards. Dostoyevsky became fond of this project and rewrote a version of it from scratch, that we take in our hands today and proudly read.

From the start of the novel, the author accomplishes to decipher that the protagonist, Raskolnikov, is tortured by his own thoughts. A student, as many, poverty-stricken, plans an instantaneous murder of an old pawnbroker, thinking it will delay his poverty for few more weeks, completely ignorant of the aftermath and having minimal self-control. This act of morality follows an aftermath which turns out to be psychological for Raskolnikov and the author spots an absolute scenario of what happens after one stands on the brink of insanity using Raskolnikov as his puppet until the protagonist is bring in contact with his own buried conscience and another sufferer. On the engagement of the book and one’s mind, one will indulge in it actively enough as the plot moves forward.

There is suspense in the novel no doubt. Dostoyevsky, in some amount succeeds in the main theme which he tries to revolve around the story: redemption. Characters like Raskolnikov do have a place in a reader’s mind once they have acquired his attention, for longer period of time. But novels like itself, fails to provide strong reasoning for characters who prove to be a drag thoughtout it. I am not going to name a few, you have to read it and judge it for yourself. My assessment is this, when moving forward the path author wants it to and so does the reader, then why a writer like Dostoyevsky would use elements to create a labyrinth, a maze which has no possible point to prove through the novel and does proves to be unnecessary?
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Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Art of Creative Thinking by Rod Judkins


Buy this Book on Amazon

We are all capable of thinking creatively. Why? It gives better productivity, more satisfaction than the mediocre, and improves visualisation. Rod Judkins, the author of The Art of Creative Thinking, is a lecturer and an academic on the arts. But this certainly doesn’t mean one has to attend or get some modern education on attaining the creativity. There is no fountain of creativity to drink from.

On reading The Art of Creative Thinking, I observed from Chap 1, that Judkins knows what he is talking about. He quotes, he para-phrases, and he writes mostly about the obstacle one intends to face when suffering from lack of creativity and how to develop some cues and turn them into habits as you progress in your daily life. This is not a self help, or is concluded in that way, this is my conclusion. You can have yours once you are done with it. That’s why Judkins’ book is so special. It doesn’t conclude in a definitive manner and rather leave that part up to you. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Art of Creative Thinking by Rod Judkins”