Top Non Fiction Books I read in 2016 Part 2

Hola! Welcome back to “Read in 2016” series of posts. I am glad you read the first post in the series in which I suggest you Top Non-Fiction Books I read this year, irrespective of their publication date. As, in the previous post, I discussed by motive to come out with these book lists is that to make your TBR list for next year, a bit heavy. So, I hope you are ready for some more titles. If you haven’t read the post go and read it here.

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BOOK REVIEW: Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

This book is a great introduction to start on the matter of educating yourself in terms of “money”. This is the message Robert Kiyosaki wants to convey in this 200 pages long book.

This book isn’t about money, it is about how we think and are taught to think from an early age about money and not in terms of money. Education brings wisdom in a person but to be educated in terms of money or in Kiyosaki’s words, being “financially literate” is an important aspect of how we are going to solve the money problems we face everyday and for the rest of our lives. Working hard, keeping our day jobs at bay is an effort we all try to make but only to pay bills. Kiyosaki explains the difference between assets and liabilities and how apart from paying bills, we can earn money in longer terms and for better future.

Kiyosaki addresses his two fathers in this book, one who is highly educated in terms of academia, and the other is educated in terms of being wealthy and making “money work for him”. One father advises him on to get a college degree and get a job that is secured and other puts emphasis on being learning how money, market, and related terminology like accounting works. In other terms getting little knowledge of how everything is part of the same cycle and you must how that cycle runs otherwise being unfamiliar with one section of that cycle can harm you in long term. In his simple narrative, the author compares both aspects by narrating stories that include both his fathers and what suggestions they gave him and how he draw his own conclusions and his emphasis on where he combine best of both the worlds.

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REVIEW: Seneca On Anger

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, or Seneca was a philosopher and is best known for his wisdom that may help one to rethink of his own perspectives on life. Seneca was a stoic and during his time embraced Stoicism. He was also an advisor to the Roman Emperor, Nero, in 54 AD. His essays such as On Shortness of Life, and On Anger clearly reflect his contribution to the Stoic philosophy.

Surprisingly, I was never introduced to the word Stoicism before. Not during my school years, nor my college years. I guess, it is my mistake that I was never curious enough to explore, open to ideas such as Stoicism posses, until recently when I first read Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations.

On Anger is a book which is further divided into three books in which Seneca reflects how this passion, this feeling can make us endure for the rest of our lives. He describes anger as an emotion, “and under its possession any human being does remain not humane.” We have all felt anger, on various points. Sometimes it us, many a times it because of the others, we may think. Some follow it is quite pragmatically causing terror that reflect up on the rest of the humanity. Some just want to avenge on the injury they have become a victim to:

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BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz

Let’s talk about reading books on books. Reading books on books is a constant reminder on why I love to read. Ruined by Reading offers a somewhat a deep insight on why we read and how what we read might shape our lives. It provides an interesting, curiosity arousing introduction to reading variety of books. Also, the title is captivating as well as ironical.

As we grow up and pretend to become more mature, our reading changes with us. The desire to read almost every book still remains but has taken a different form and shape inside me. We understand more, with age, the usefulness of reading a book.

Schwartz’s book reminded me of times when I was indulging myself into this vast world of reading. Schwartz understand and clearly observes that how obsessive are the readers. She then discusses how books have small part, Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Ruined By Reading- A Life in Books by Lynne Sharon Schwartz”

A Half Yearly Reading List

Half of the year has gone, and we have our noses inside the books we are reading and our thoughts mingling around the books we want to read. 2016 has not been so much of a reading year for me as 2015 was. But I have read some good books and few great ones too. Thus, I am compiling a list of books that I have read this year and would like to share with you. Worth taking a look:

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BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross

The Calling is the first novel featuring DCI John Luther. Yes, the same Luther you saw on telly as I did, played by Idris Elba. There are so many DC’s and DCI’s the modern British Crime Fiction has produced, so why bother about this one? As usually, he is tortured and that is interesting. Aren’t all?

DCI John Luther has a clearance rate of cases which is extraordinary as it is portrayed by Neil Cross in the telly series too, in the first few episodes. If you have watched the series or/are planning to, you can still read the book. The consequences of this book are what followed by the television series. It’s a prequel.

The plot is simple, John Luther is hunting for a brutal murderer and baby kidnapper who intends to do what he has done again. Now, the most extraordinary thing is there in this simplicity and the credit goes to the author of the book, Neil Cross. The opening scene is do dramatised and there a few more to grab, I feel as if it was a real crime scene in front of me. Every detail is spectacularly written, and very rare in crime fiction novels do you find such generous reception. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross”

BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett

Self-help genre is not for everyone. Especially not for me. Either it is too positive for a dream to come true in man’s life that is unachievable (and for my taste) or it is too boring. But they are a business, in a big business. Dr. Michael Bennet (a psychiatrist) and his daughter/writer Sarah Bennet suggests we are too emotional over self-help books. Actually, not only self-help books, but about everything.

The title of the book, F*ck Feelings: One Shrink’s Practical Advice for Managing All Life’s Impossible Problems, is perfect, and certainly matches the context inside as the book provides some practical solutions to common problems we all face at various times in our lives. The target audience of this book are people who loath self-help books, but I would recommend this to those who love self-help books too. It’s a new insight to very common discussion regarding self-improvement, self-esteem, life’s fairness and unfairness, over helpfulness, serenity or the peace of mind, love, communication, parenthood, assholes, and treatment. It’s about understanding oneself.

This book is about how we over think about every situation as how we let our emotions control our sanity and disrupt our daily/hourly musings. We want to accomplish things that are not pragmatically possible for any living creature, emotionally. I am not saying we should not try for things which many think are cuffed by the word impossible, it’s all about self-control. But try to understand the stuff this books covers and I am talking about are different from the stuff people you are surrounded with may implicitly suggest impossible. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: F*ck Feelings by Michael Bennett and Sarah Bennett”