Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, Reviews, Thrillers

BOOK REVIEW: The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye by David Lagercrantz

Pages: 448, Kindle Edition
Published: 2017 by MacLehose Press
Cover Rating: 4/5
To continue the legacy left by Steig Larsson, Swedish writer David Lagercrantz has made another effort with the release of The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye. Blomkvist and Salander join forces once again to try and bring down the forces of the Registry. It is being chilly here in past few days, and I love reading crime novels at this time of the year. Perfect weather for Scandinavian crime stories.

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Authors, blog, Book Reviews, Books, Business, Non-Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Who me, Poor? by Gayatri Jayaraman

Pages: 184
Published: 2017 by Bloomsbury
Cover Rating: 5/5
Gayatri Jayaraman’s article The Urban Poor You Haven’t Noticed: Millennials Who’re Broke, Hungry, But On Trend on BuzzFeed last year was realistic and fascinating. It what tempted me more to give this book a read. The main theme it covers is what can be label as Urban Poverty that can be seen as an after effect in corporate offices after Friday nights and weekends spend in bars and lounges.

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Vagabonding An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long Term World Travel by Rolf Potts

Pages: 224, Kindle Edition
Published: January 2002
Cover Rating: 3/5

“Long-term travel isn’t about being a college student; it’s about being a student of daily life. Long-term travel isn’t an act of rebellion against society; it’s an act of common sense within society. Long-term travel doesn’t require a massive “bundle of cash”; it requires only that we walk through the world in a more deliberate way.”

Rolf Potts travelled more than 60 countries across six continents. He is the author of Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel, a book that fascinated me a for long time before I decided to finally give it a read. All that excitement was worth.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, philosophy, science fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Project Bodi by Hosein Kouros-Mehr

Pages: 219, Kindle Edition
Published: September 2017
Cover Rating: 3/5
How many science fiction books you have read on the future of out species? Out of them, how many are dystopian? Recently, I watched Blade Runner and I liked the flying cars. What if the occurrence of changes are dystopian not as the society but for the large corporations of the world of today. What if Apple becomes obsolete?

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Boomerang by Temba Magorimbo

Pages: 446, Kindle Edition
Published: 2016 
Cover Rating: 3/5

Boomerang by Temba Magorimbo is based in Africa and is one those few novels that I have read that allows me to explore the enormous continent. The novel is a unique in many ways with a good start that allows the reader like myself to indulge in it from page one.

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, philosophy, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Ikigai – The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life

Pages: 192, Kindle Edition
Published: August 2017 by Penguin Books
Cover Rating: 5/5

The positive attitude and emotional awareness of Japanese is appealing to anyone since it is directly associated with health. It is known that people of Japan have longest life expectancy in the world. Don’t we all want to live a long, and healthy life? Co-authors of this book, Frances Miralles and Hector Garcia did research on this variables and the main subject of their research was the elderly in Japan. The result is Ikigai, the book rightly titled.

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Zero Debt by Neeraj Deginal

Pages: 112, Kindle Edition

Published: 2017 by Happy Self Publishing

Cover Rating: 3/5

The modernisation is leading to an increase in debt cycles of an individual. We have seen that in the last decade, and what may the future holds. This is the core foundation of Neeraj Deginal’s latest book Zero Debt: Break the Debt Cycle and Reclaim Your Life, a part memoir and other half of the book is full of some pragmatic advice.

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Black Tiger by Srijan Pal Singh

Pages: 208, Paperback

Published: August 2017 by Fingerprint! Publishing

Cover Rating: 5/5

The Black Tiger by Srijan Pal Singh is an analysis of one the most grave topic of corruption and black money and because of that the youth of India as a nation, which is at its peak in terms of population, is on the verge of losing hope with this democratic nation.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Walter – The Homeless Man by Tekoa Manning

Pages: 512, Paperback
Published: 2013 by It’s All about Him, Inc.
Cover Rating: 4/5

I am glad I got the chance to read this exceptional work. It is a wonderful feeling for a reader to read a book that has a strong on going plot with mature and very well build characters. This quality to be expressed in the form of a writing is rare and Manning has displayed this through her novel.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Arnos Hell – Horror at NHS Direct by Eamonn Murphy

Pages: 125, Kindle Edition

Published: 2014 by EAMONN JAMES MURPHY

Cover Rating: 3/5

On the eve of Halloween this year, I decided to read something different. A book that is based on the Halloween night, written by Eamonn Murphy, Arnos Hell – Horror at NHS Direct. I know many think that horror fiction is not their piece of bread, I used to think that, but I must tell you there are books that might seem to represent a traditional way of this genre but are attractive enough to try out. Not every spirit is bad, there are some good souls even in afterlife.

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