Announcement

I am open to Book Review Requests

Hi People,

I’ll keep this short. I have been blogging now for four years and I have written numerous book reviews, interviewed some of the best selling authors (like The Martian’s Andy Weir). I publicly announce that I am open to give my honest feedback over your book/manuscript in the form a review.

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Awards

Rewarded: Best Book Blog in India 2017

Best Blogs In India

Thank you Incomeboy

This is an informal gratitude post and I’d like to thank Incomboy.com for the honour of nominating and rewarding Confessions of a Readaholic,  the blog you are currently reading, among the best Book Blogs in India, 2017. It shows that my readers are willing to trust me over their next book read. This is very generous of you all. I want to give the gratitude back by thanking each and every reader of this blog for keeping your trust in me.

I’ll keep reading and recommending you books and in hope that you will find them useful and interesting.

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Books, Guest Post, Non-Fiction

Guest Post: To make a writer by Peter Gray

Telemachus, how did it come about?

For someone who has spent a long career treating Thoroughbred horses – for everything from infertility to racing performance – the transformation to writer has been a long, unlikely and tenuous road.  I started dabbling with a pen back in the Seventies, realised it wasn’t a natural talent of mine, but doggedness convinced me to continue.  I read a lot of fiction, but always with reservations about copying style or ideas.  It was my aim, if I might ever succeed, to have a voice that would be distinctly my own and I didn’t want to steal anyone else’s ideas – even subconsciously.  So I muddled on and the efforts weren’t very good; if I was learning and felt there were mild signs of improvement – as well as an innate inability to accept failure.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVEIW: Dance Dance Dance by Haruki Murakami

Dance Dance Dance by Haruki Murakami is the fourth book in the Rat Chronicles but it is not required for you to read the all the books in the chronicles before this one. This fourth part is more of a sequel to the third one, A Wild Sheep Chase but still has little connection to it.

This book is narrated by a nameless writer who is divorced. The story starts with his adventures and memories of a hotel in the mountains of Sapporo, where his mediocre life is elevated by an incident that builds the course of this novel. His ex-girlfriend, named Kiki in the book, and no second name provided, has mysteriously disappeared. He encounters the Sheep Man, a being from another world that claims everything and everyone in the writer’s life are connected. He meets a friend who is a famous actor and just spends money to show his expenses. Then he come across a thirteen year old girl with whom his friendship grows through out the novel.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Butterflies, Parathas, and the Bhagavad Gita

Published by: Amaryllis

 424 Pages | Fiction | Spirituality

Gita is a big part of Indian Philosophy. I don’t see it as just a religious scripture, certainly not, after reading S. Hari Haran’s Butterflies, Parathas, and the Bhagavad Gita: A Quirky and Heartwarming Journey Through God’s Instruction Manual for Life. Understanding spirituality is the same as understanding yourself and this book is a great pivot either if you have never read Bhagavad Gita or had a touch at your inner self.

This book is more than the work of fiction. It is a blend of fiction and spirituality. It revolves around two lifelong friends as they have a contrast which varies between them. Not in the good or evil sense. The question here is deeper as it concerns knowing oneself. Both are flawed men as their diurnal life is effected by this ancient scripture which frequently brings certain changes. This illuminating story is completely based on the essence of Bhagvad Gita and it is not about the Gods. It’s about you.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Gandhi, Ambedkar and the Four Legged Scorpion

Published: October, 2016

Pages: 185

Not very often do I come across a contemporary written piece that discuss an important aspect of Indian history. Gandhi, Ambedkar and the Four Legged Scorpion by Rajesh Talwar is that rarity. This play set in pre-1947 and is based on real events, expressed to the readers through writer’s imagination.

The play introduces both Gandhi and Ambedkar, both are important figures in Indian History and politics, through significant events in their lives. In an opening scene Gandhi is shown to have been thrown off a train with his baggage. Babasaheb Ambedkar’s life also proves to be life changing.

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Book Reviews, Books, Business, Non-Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Tao of Charlie Munger by David Clark

“It’s been my experience in life, if you just keep thinking and reading, you don’t have to work.”

The Tao of Charlie Munger by David Clark is a collection of quotes from Berkshire Hathway’s Vice Chairman on Life, Business and the Pursuit of Wealth. Born in Omaha, Nebraska in 1924 Charlie Munger studied mathematics at the University of Michigan, trained as a meteorologist at Cal Tech Pasadena while in the Army, and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School without ever earning an undergraduate degree. Today, Munger is one of America’s most successful investors and Warren Buffett’s business partner for almost forty years. Buffett says “Berkshire has been built to Charlie’s blueprint. My role has been that of general contractor.” Munger is an intelligent, opinionated business man whose ideas can teach professional and amateur investors how to be successful in finance and life.

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Books, Fiction, Reviews

REVIEW: The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks

My Rating: 4/5

Published in 1984, The Wasp Factory is quite a grim and startling story about 16 year old Frank Cauldhame. It was the first ever book by Scottish author Iain Bank.

Sometimes I wonder, what if we somehow know that everything is coming to a definitive end and there is limited amount of Time is left in our hands. What will we do? What will I do?

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Book Reviews, Books, Non-Fiction, Productivity

BOOK REVIEW: Don’t Sweat The Small Stuff by Richard Carlson

My Rating: 4/5

To find time for self-reflection is essential for personal growth. We can automate other habits but self-reflection. The reason is simple, the process of self-reflection can make be overwhelming. In a broader perspective, Richard Carlson’s Don’t Sweat The Small Stuff… and It’s All Small Stuff: Simple Ways To Keep The Little Things From Taking Over Your Life serves its purpose by providing wisdom in terms of strategies in over 100 short chapters in this book.

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Books, classics, Non-Fiction, philosophy, Reviews

Walden and Other Writings by Henry David Thoreau

My Rating: 4/5

 

Simplicity, Simplicity, Simplicity

This is a call for self-honesty and harmony with nature in the writings of Henry David Thoreau.

Walden was published in 1854 written during the reign of transcendentalists of which Thoreau was a central figure. Transcendental was a philosophical movement that was influenced by romanticism, Platonism and Kantian philosophy in which one must examine and analyse the reasoning process which governs the nature of experience. German philosopher Immanuel Kant developed the base idea for this movement.

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