Authors, Book List, Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

Top Fiction Books I Read in 2016

Once again, I am offering you a number of books I enjoyed reading last year in a broader sense of a genre: Fiction.

Stoner by John Williams

A fascinating, fast, elegant read. William Stoner and we all have something in common.

Read Full Review

Continue reading “Top Fiction Books I Read in 2016”

Spotlight/Giveaway

SPOTLIGHT: Deceiving Bella by Cate Beauman

Ethan Cooke Security and their bodyguard team return to action in Deceiving Bella – book eleven in Cate Beauman’s Bodyguards of L.A. County series.

With over 7700 reviews and a 4.4 rating for the entire series, see why the Bodyguards of L.A. County is a multi-award winning series.

Buy It Now! Amazon | Kobo | Nook | iBooks

New to the series? No problem! Each book in the Bodyguards series is a stand-alone title. Although reading the books in order is preferred, it is not necessary.  Each title features brand new primary characters and limited overlapping secondary characters.  Don’t hesitate to jump right in!

Isabella Colby has always yearned for normalcy. Now that she’s settled in LA, she finally has it. Good friends, a pretty home, and her thriving career as the Palisades’ top skincare specialist are a dream come true. Bella is content until she meets her hunky new neighbor, but her attraction to the blue-eyed cutie is the least of her worries when contacting her long-lost father threatens to destroy her happy life.
Reed McKinley is more than ready to forget the past. His seven-year stint as an NYPD detective nearly got him killed. His wounds have healed and he’s starting over as Ethan Cooke Security’s latest recruit. With sixty-hour workweeks and little time to himself, the last thing on his mind is a relationship. Then he bumps into the gorgeous woman next door.

Continue reading “SPOTLIGHT: Deceiving Bella by Cate Beauman”

5 Stars, Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Thrillers

BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin

Rebus is back. And he’s not getting old, age seem just a number for him and his creator, Ian Rankin. He’s 21 books old now. Rather Be The Devil is the new entitlement released on November, 3rd. When I heard earlier this year that Ian Rankin has rejected to my request for an interview with for a third time in three years, I thought, ‘Oh Boy! Either I am a pretty bad interviewer or he’s upto something really good. Probably a new Rebus novel. I’ll take that gladly, sir.’

Rebus is into his retirement for almost a couple of years now. But curiosity is a disease and when one’s neurone start sending the type of electrical signals, the giant awakens. Mind gets to work and pulls bits and pieces out of the back of itself. It happens to humans, generally. Nonetheless, Rebus breathe and lives to the extent you can almost smell the cigarette he’s been smoking, but not this time, anyway.

So now you know the process, Rebus mind draws his conscious attention to a cold case from 1970s involving a murder of a female socialite in one of the Edinburgh’s luxurious hotels. An unturned stone for over forty years, and no one was found guilty. Lacking hobbies in his sixties, Rebus, starts up a personal investigation with series of meetings with some old frenemies like Big Ger Cafferty and an ex-cop. Things have already begin to turn nasty in Edinburgh when both DI Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox come across each other once again despite their lack of communication over time to look into those nastier things themselves. Local crime boss and entrepreneur is hurt. Money problems, shell companies, skeletons in the closet and a dangerous mobster hovering over the city of Edinburgh.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin”

Book List, Books, Fiction

Let’s Read James Patterson

James Patterson is  a machine when comes to writing and publishing books. For almost half a year, one or the other from his books is on New York Times Bestseller List. People read him. His books are fast paced and you can manage to read one of them while traveling to your work in day or two (assuming the distance between your work and where you live is nearly 2 hours) or if you want to accomplish reading in shorter period of time frame and some of his books are able to satisfy the demands of voracious readers. I mean the usual: the P/PC balance between the plot and its characters.

I haven’t ready of his book in a long time. It has been almost two years since I read any of his title and the last one I remember reading is I, Alex Cross. Few years back in the post, Mistress by James Patterson & David Ellis, I admitted that Mr. Patterson’s books are worth reading only when they are written solo and not co-authored along with anyone. At that time, I met some disappointments with his Private Series. Then I came across Alex Cross series which undoubtedly are good books though I haven’t explored it very much in-depth.

Here is a complete list of books written by James Patterson that have been or are releasing this year:

NYPD RED 4 | 4 Feb ’16


PRIVATE PARIS | 21 Mar ’16


15th AFFAIR | 7 Mar ’16

CROSS KILLS | 7 June ’16

ZOO 2 | 7 June ’16

THE GAMES |  27 June ’16

HUMANS, BOW DOWN | 1 August ’16

Recently with release of his new book, The Games which is a part of Private series and is co-authored by Mark Sullivan, I am going to try again and see if his co-authored books show some signs improvement lately. By improvement I mean the obvious: plot and characters.


Do you read James Patterson?

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: City of Bones by Michael Connelly

When it comes to cold cases, we love one of them. We, humans, are designed in a way that digging up the past is not only a hobby or an option for some but it is rather an astonishing state of affairs for everyone. Even the crime fiction writers, such as Michael Connelly.

This is though not my first experience with Connelly’s books. Previously, I read his The Lincoln Lawyer which I thought was an average book and looked better on the big screen with tanned up Matthew McConaughey and his southern accent. After getting much annoyed on listening his fans chanting his name through and through, not wanting to turn a Connelly hater but wanting to explore the world of crime fiction, I decided to give Harry Bosch a chance this time.

Detective Harry Bosch come across a twenty year old murder case, when the bones of a twelve-year-old boy are found and scattered in Hollywood Hills, Bosch’s own territory. With media attending already on the case, the pressure on Bosh grows as he uncovers the story and life of the dead boy. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: City of Bones by Michael Connelly”

Book List, Crime & Mystery

5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015

I love reading Crime Fiction novels. They are intriguing, a dynamic pace is maintained by most of the authors in their works and they are often surprising.

Hanging Garden is Rankin’s complete novel and is 9th John Rebus novel, and becomes more fascinating.

My Rating 5 out of 5!

It’s winter and what will be better, if not be in Russia. At least Tom Rob Smith’s Child 44 can take us there. Stalin’s Soviet Union, a paradise in books but not in reality. This thrilling novel is the first of Leo Demidov’s trilogy.

My Rating: 4 out of 5  

Another gripping novel, full of thrill and after reading it, there will be some amount of adrenaline rush left inside you. Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

My Rating 4 out of 5 Continue reading “5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Mortal Causes by Ian Rankin

One of the good things about the contemporary crime fiction that can happen to itself is John Rebus and his creator Ian Rankin. Without Ian Rankin, there would have been no John Rebus. Rankin has certainly set a benchmark with his John Rebus’ series and Mortal Causes is the sixth book in this series. Without John Rebus, I won’t be reading as much crime fiction as I do. I started reading John Rebus, even before I laid my hands on Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. Things are even darker than usual this time in Mortal Causes.

It is August during the Edinburgh Festival when Inspector John Rebus is called to investigate a brutally tortured body found hanging in the medieval subterranean streets of Edinburgh. The death looks like an execution which causes Rebus to start investigating radical activists. Even worse, he discovers the victim is the son of one of Edinburgh’s most notorious criminal gang leaders, Gerald McCafferty.

With well-crafted characters and the plot so interesting the author makes the book interesting by adding a a challenging situation in which Rebus needs to develop a level of understanding with Big Ger McCafferty. It sounds darker than most of his novels and it turns to be exactly how it sounds. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Mortal Causes by Ian Rankin”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Another year, another bestseller. A book that will keep on turning the pages by itself. It’s The Girl on the Train, one of the most successful books of the year, fastest selling adult novel in the history, another psychological thriller, comparable to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl as the plot is full of lies and unreliable narration.

The girl on the train is Rachel, a lonely, alcoholic divorcée who rides the train to and from London each day, hoping to keep her long-suffering roommate from discovering that she’s been fired from her job. The train, cruelly, passes each day by the house where she once lived with her adored ex-husband. Rachel directs her focus a few houses down, where another young couple lives, envying their seemingly blissful partnership. One day, she is shaken by what she sees at the couple’s house and soon after, the wife disappears. Rachel, convinced the event she witnessed is relevant to the case, is quickly drawn into the mystery, but her debilitating alcoholism and the blackouts caused by her binges make her an unreliable witness, untrusted by the authorities and even by herself. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Girl in the Spider’s Web by David Lagercrantz

Blog Tour Banner“NOTE: THE LINK TO THE GIVEAWAY IS BELOW”

GirlSpidersWeb_Poster_F_OPT copyA few critics are claiming the new addition in Stieg Larsson’s famous Millennium Trilogy, The Girl in the Spider’s Web as controversial. Written by David Lagercrantz who previously had two titles named under him: a non-fiction and a fiction, both translated in English language. Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy is a huge success worldwide and adaptions are already out there. The previous three novels are gripping, rich in thrill, and intelligent. One who has read any of the three, knows very well what I am trying to express here. And he must be excited about this new addition.

There were no pre-review copies or excerpts of this novel, The Girl in the Spider’s Web. It was released earlier this month. Like countless readers, I have been waiting to get my hands on it, find out myself the standard set by Larsson, will it be matched? Of course not! Stieg Larsson’s writing is exceptional. The way he conveyed his ideas in those three books, only he could do it. Though, as a writer of this book, David Lagercrantz does a good job in maintaining those characters, putting some more insight which continues to make the Millennium trilogy interesting.

The Girl in the Spider’s Web looks deeper in the world of hackers as it is all about them. It share a similar starting point as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Mikael Blomqvist’s is in search of a story, a cover story, and the situation is an intense one. From the previous three books, we learned that the pierced Lisbeth Salander was a formidable hacker, and in a world of warring hackers, she is the unquestioned genius. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Girl in the Spider’s Web by David Lagercrantz”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Casino Royale by Ian Fleming

The famous spy character of James Bond first appeared physically in the book Casino Royale written by Ian Fleming. It was published in 1953. Post war readers were thrilled by he Fleming’s mix of colour, escapism, sadism, sex and food, and both the author and his creation went to become world-famous entities (especially the character).

The plot involves a Soviet agent, a member of SMERSH- an organisation similar to KGB. His name is Le Chiffre and he lives in France. He has run into a trouble with his organisation for lavish spending of his assigned funds. He knows that he is a dead man until he recovers the money and comes up with a plan. He tries to make money by winning in casinos using his gambling abilities. James Bond, the best gambler in MI6 is assigned to play against Le Chiffre at the gambling table and to win money from him, thus prompting SMERSH to assassinate him.

One thing in the text of the book that will come across almost every reader is that Fleming uses compact sentences. Yet his third person narrative is enthusiastic and entertaining. He describes every character in crisp detail, sometimes going into their backstories from where the enthusiasm part comes. Fleming draws a vivid picture of cars, clothing, drinks, food, cigarettes, seaside towns, and French casinos. In Casino Royale, he even gives the reader baccarat and roulette lessons. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Casino Royale by Ian Fleming”