Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Thrillers

REVIEW: Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie

I must confess the Hercule Poirot is not one of my favourite detectives. Not even close. But that’s personal opinion. What I enjoy most Poirot’s cases or I must say, Agatha Christie’s writing is the how the cases unfold in the end after reaching the climax. This book has a brilliant ending, that’s all. No spoilers. I enjoy her writing which never fails to create a tension on the reader to get to the end of it. And Then There Were None is the best case scenario.

Continue reading “REVIEW: Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case by Agatha Christie”

Spotlight/Giveaway

SPOTLIGHT: Deceiving Bella by Cate Beauman

Ethan Cooke Security and their bodyguard team return to action in Deceiving Bella – book eleven in Cate Beauman’s Bodyguards of L.A. County series.

With over 7700 reviews and a 4.4 rating for the entire series, see why the Bodyguards of L.A. County is a multi-award winning series.

Buy It Now! Amazon | Kobo | Nook | iBooks

New to the series? No problem! Each book in the Bodyguards series is a stand-alone title. Although reading the books in order is preferred, it is not necessary.  Each title features brand new primary characters and limited overlapping secondary characters.  Don’t hesitate to jump right in!

Isabella Colby has always yearned for normalcy. Now that she’s settled in LA, she finally has it. Good friends, a pretty home, and her thriving career as the Palisades’ top skincare specialist are a dream come true. Bella is content until she meets her hunky new neighbor, but her attraction to the blue-eyed cutie is the least of her worries when contacting her long-lost father threatens to destroy her happy life.
Reed McKinley is more than ready to forget the past. His seven-year stint as an NYPD detective nearly got him killed. His wounds have healed and he’s starting over as Ethan Cooke Security’s latest recruit. With sixty-hour workweeks and little time to himself, the last thing on his mind is a relationship. Then he bumps into the gorgeous woman next door.

Continue reading “SPOTLIGHT: Deceiving Bella by Cate Beauman”

5 Stars, Book Reviews, Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Thrillers

BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin

Rebus is back. And he’s not getting old, age seem just a number for him and his creator, Ian Rankin. He’s 21 books old now. Rather Be The Devil is the new entitlement released on November, 3rd. When I heard earlier this year that Ian Rankin has rejected to my request for an interview with for a third time in three years, I thought, ‘Oh Boy! Either I am a pretty bad interviewer or he’s upto something really good. Probably a new Rebus novel. I’ll take that gladly, sir.’

Rebus is into his retirement for almost a couple of years now. But curiosity is a disease and when one’s neurone start sending the type of electrical signals, the giant awakens. Mind gets to work and pulls bits and pieces out of the back of itself. It happens to humans, generally. Nonetheless, Rebus breathe and lives to the extent you can almost smell the cigarette he’s been smoking, but not this time, anyway.

So now you know the process, Rebus mind draws his conscious attention to a cold case from 1970s involving a murder of a female socialite in one of the Edinburgh’s luxurious hotels. An unturned stone for over forty years, and no one was found guilty. Lacking hobbies in his sixties, Rebus, starts up a personal investigation with series of meetings with some old frenemies like Big Ger Cafferty and an ex-cop. Things have already begin to turn nasty in Edinburgh when both DI Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox come across each other once again despite their lack of communication over time to look into those nastier things themselves. Local crime boss and entrepreneur is hurt. Money problems, shell companies, skeletons in the closet and a dangerous mobster hovering over the city of Edinburgh.

Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Rather Be The Devil by Ian Rankin”

Books, Fiction

What did I read this week?

Current week is to an end and I am still not finished with Wilkie Collins’ WOMAN IN WHITE. Many say it’s his masterpiece but I am reading Collins for the first time and not even a hundred pages complete. It’s a mystery novel and has a Gothic theme with psychological realism which I am yet to explore. More this week, I had more than usual amount of free time and the amount of books I have to read is always, enormous. Thus to take the matter in my own hands and with blessings of time, I decided to binge reading and ended up reading first two books of Lord Peter Wimsey, Whose Body? & Clouds of Witness written by Dorothy Sayers.

               

Lord Peter Wimsey, as I like to imagine, is an unusual sort of character to be a detective in detective fiction with his reputation in London’s Society and the wealth of his family.

Continue reading “What did I read this week?”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

This one certainly one of the most famous Agatha Christie’s crime tale. Whomsoever I am talking with about crime fiction, does bring up Agatha Christie (even if they haven’t read her). The queen of crime as they like to call her, but Hercule Poirot certainly not the king of detectives.

Murder on the Orient Express is a renowned locked room mystery. A locked room mystery, if elaborated is a crime that sounds impossible to ensue. The plot starts on the famous Orient Express train that promises to take her passengers to a journey across the Europe, but is stuck somewhere in between due to heavy snow. Now this is a real incident, an experience the queen of crime has shared with us, her readers from the memorabilia of her life.

This locked room mystery is based on the whole coach of the Orient Express and Hercule Poirot happens to be in that coach. The deed is done, the culprit runs away and Poirot is given the task of bringing the culprit into the spotlight and by deducing his every move, to satisfy his own curiosity as well as the readers of the book. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie”

Book List, Crime & Mystery

5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015

I love reading Crime Fiction novels. They are intriguing, a dynamic pace is maintained by most of the authors in their works and they are often surprising.

Hanging Garden is Rankin’s complete novel and is 9th John Rebus novel, and becomes more fascinating.

My Rating 5 out of 5!

It’s winter and what will be better, if not be in Russia. At least Tom Rob Smith’s Child 44 can take us there. Stalin’s Soviet Union, a paradise in books but not in reality. This thrilling novel is the first of Leo Demidov’s trilogy.

My Rating: 4 out of 5  

Another gripping novel, full of thrill and after reading it, there will be some amount of adrenaline rush left inside you. Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

My Rating 4 out of 5 Continue reading “5 Crime Fiction Novels I read in 2015”

Books, Essay

The World of Crime Fiction

In Italy, people call a story that consist of detectives or crimes giallo, for the word yellow. The reason is that since 1930s mostly crime fiction books had yellow covers. The earliest known crime fiction book is over twenty pages and is written by Danish author Steen Steensen Blicher and published in 1829. It is called The Rector of Veilbye and is supposedly based on a true murder case from 1626 in Vejlby, Denmark. The story is in the form of diary entries by a character named Erik Sorensen whose focus is on a trial about an unexplained disappearance of a farm labourer and after fifteen years the bones are unearthed.

The evolution and popularity of the genre increased in late nineteenth century in UK and USA, offering cheap paperbacks and mass producing them. Author like Arthur Conan Doyle made a huge contribution in the development of this literary genre for the famous detective Sherlock Holmes. Continue reading “The World of Crime Fiction”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Mortal Causes by Ian Rankin

One of the good things about the contemporary crime fiction that can happen to itself is John Rebus and his creator Ian Rankin. Without Ian Rankin, there would have been no John Rebus. Rankin has certainly set a benchmark with his John Rebus’ series and Mortal Causes is the sixth book in this series. Without John Rebus, I won’t be reading as much crime fiction as I do. I started reading John Rebus, even before I laid my hands on Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes. Things are even darker than usual this time in Mortal Causes.

It is August during the Edinburgh Festival when Inspector John Rebus is called to investigate a brutally tortured body found hanging in the medieval subterranean streets of Edinburgh. The death looks like an execution which causes Rebus to start investigating radical activists. Even worse, he discovers the victim is the son of one of Edinburgh’s most notorious criminal gang leaders, Gerald McCafferty.

With well-crafted characters and the plot so interesting the author makes the book interesting by adding a a challenging situation in which Rebus needs to develop a level of understanding with Big Ger McCafferty. It sounds darker than most of his novels and it turns to be exactly how it sounds. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Mortal Causes by Ian Rankin”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Tooth And Nail by Ian Rankin

Tooth and Nail is the third novel by Ian Rankin featuring Inspector John Rebus. Rebus is sent to London to help detectives hunt a serial killer dubbed the Wolfman by the press. In the previous year, in some reviews and an essay on John Rebus, I have talked about Rebus a lot. My love and hate relationship with him and his actions and why he is to be considered as one of the most proficient detectives written in the contemporary world.

Rebus arrives in London just as news of a new victim of the serial killer begins broadcasting over the news. Rebus goes directly to the scene of the crime and is shocked to see the brutality first hand of a case he has only read about. Rebus attends the autopsy and spends some time with the lead detective, uncomfortably aware that this detective seems to think he is some sort of expert based on one case Rebus worked several years before.

Meanwhile, he is as usual vulnerable to some aspect of the story. He is new to London, despise it, and his ex-wife and teenage daughter live in London and a visit with them reveals that his daughter is dating someone who is not the kind of person a copper would choose for his daughter. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Tooth And Nail by Ian Rankin”

Book List, Books, Crime & Mystery

A Glimpse of The World with Detectives

In the previous post, The World of Crime Fiction, I talked briefly about the origins of crime fiction. In this post I present you a list of detectives around the world.

Ian Rankin’s John Rebus books set in Edinburgh are engrossing tales of a misanthropic policeman who solves crime ordinarily or extraordinarily committed.

Set in Reykjavik,  Arnaldur Indridason’s Inspector Erlendur novels have the bleak setting, social realism and gentle pacing associated with Scandinavian noir. Continue reading “A Glimpse of The World with Detectives”