Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: The Bride Who Would Not Burn by Rajesh Talwar

Rajesh Talwar is a prolific writer of modern India. This is his third published book I have read in a month. He has touched few themes that the modern Indian society either still considered them as taboo or are not taken serious enough such that the issue become might have a chaotic effect for some time over the whole society directly or indirectly. One of them is the issue of dowry and its side-effects. This disease is still in practice in this country and is one of the realities of modern India.

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Book Reviews, Books, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Gandhi, Ambedkar and the Four Legged Scorpion

Published: October, 2016

Pages: 185

Not very often do I come across a contemporary written piece that discuss an important aspect of Indian history. Gandhi, Ambedkar and the Four Legged Scorpion by Rajesh Talwar is that rarity. This play set in pre-1947 and is based on real events, expressed to the readers through writer’s imagination.

The play introduces both Gandhi and Ambedkar, both are important figures in Indian History and politics, through significant events in their lives. In an opening scene Gandhi is shown to have been thrown off a train with his baggage. Babasaheb Ambedkar’s life also proves to be life changing.

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Authors, Books, classics, Infographic

Introduction to The Bard

A cavalcade of Shakespeare’s Characters Source: Wikipedia

I know, most of you are familiar with the terms: The Bard, and the Bard of Avon. Recently, the world celebrated The Bard’s 400th death anniversary on April 23, 2016, and the Bard himself is unaware of.

Why “The Bard”?

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

It is almost summer everywhere and I was wondering the other summer day why is the Bard is called The Bard. In general terms, ‘bard’ means a poet. In medieval times, all bards were travelling poets who made living out of performing and telling stories. Thus so, edging out the Medieval times, our Bard was a performer in plays and loved to write plays himself.

Why Celebrate his Death Anniversary?

The reason being Shakespeare’s birthday remains unknown to us till date.

400 years, you say?

It has been four centuries since William Shakespeare wrote his last words that are still influencing the English language and a reader’s mind. Shakespeare introduced near about 1700 word to the language through his comedies, tragedies, histories and sonnets.  Such as fashionable, and eyeball. Some of them are insulting.

Where to start with Bard?

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classics, Fiction, Reviews

THE DEVIL’S DISCIPLE: A REVIEW

The Devil’s Disciple

The Devil’s Disciple was written in 1896-97 by G. Bernard Shaw. The play occurs in the town of Websterbridge, New Hampshire, in 1777 during the American Revolution. The play is written in a way in which each act ends in a cliff-hanging affair. The hero acts out of unselfish idealism. Otherwise all other characters are significant and make the play a melodrama with a difference. The court-martial scene is one of the funniest scene of its kind in dramatic literature. It revolves around a General whose witty sarcasm is classy and sophisticatedly pleasing. Shaw never losses an opportunity to attack the needless destruction of war and to make of military pomp and circumstance. As I said earlier, it is a melodrama but with a difference. To know the difference, you have to read it!