GUEST POST: Joanna Paterson

My two books of short stories, “The Old Turk and Other Tales” and “Through the Mirror”, examine that tricky balance between experience and the spiritual world that anyone—and the author—would encounter or like to encounter. There are realms which take us beyond ourselves—and I like to explore them. Short stories should stimulate thinking—they are always potentially true. So many of them lose themselves in the usual earthbound stories about romance and the twists and turns of people in love, but I tried to go beyond those confines to involve spiritual worlds. The short stories I wrote are phantastic in the sense that they treat the unseen as a vital encounter, but engage with it as a possible extension of the Self.

The stories don’t tell you what to do. They are meetings with vibrant beings, ways of seeing. Some are fun, like the story about hats in the Old Turk collection. I also call to mind the ancient goddesses and what they represent—this in Through the Mirror. You can also say this is about memory and about the sea and the land. I have been to these places—but they are transformed and show themselves in a new way.

I explore Europe and ancient places in Ohio, U.S.A., and what they represent, the unusual, the dialogue with them that can create connections, letting go the mundane, the things you are used to. I hope there is pleasure in these extensions of mind’s adventures.

What I liked most are the stories of transformation in “Through the Mirror”. The metamorphosis does not have to be into human lives, but can be a bird such as in “Jenny Wren”. Or it can have a message as in “The Owls of Scarba”. And then there are some places that simply evoke the moon and thinking in different ways of where you are, such as in an eighteenth century tower in Dessau, Germany,  or in a long forgotten village in Austria.

“The Shaman Birches of Argyll” and “The Travelling Moon”, my poetry books, on the other hand, are grounded in living and sailing on the West Coast of Scotland. They are an exploration of nature and lochs and birds, indigenous or the beings that visit. They are my encounters. I think about them and try to find them again in words. I was born in the land-locked—except for the cross European river Danube—city of Vienna.

My books of poetry probe the new countryside in the Highlands indented with water—the mysterious sea, the rising moon, the trees and ferns that grow wild on hillsides. The essence of the poetry is myth and place. Nature has different dimensions and I want to bring them close. Poetry gives feelings and vision in versions that other genres cannot.

I do not believe that even adult books should be without images. So I have given all my books illustrations. I hope you like the way words augment pictures!

My books are all available from Amazon as Kindle or print-on-demand editions under the name Joanna Paterson.

POETRY- The Voyage of Oblivion

And who has seen the moon

Will see the dawn too, soon

But what I cannot promise

Is the sun at noon.

 

It is the Isle of mystery

Where you have been dumped

And duped by the whole humanity

Relentlessly forgotten

Left all by yourself.

 

In other sense you are free

Fromm all those norms and taboo

From every injustice and corruption

That you were forcefully made part of

Without a standing ovation.

 

You can take of the self

There is water and air and peace

Nothing else that you need

While you build the ship for you will need it

Build the ship and name it death.

Poetry- Wraith of Myself

In a distance I can hear a howl

With the fall of the rain, howl is supported

Tonight is a lonely night

And he stands beside me like a ghost

Not listening to what I hear, melonchically.

 

Under the terrible light

I cannot see somebody else

It’s all misty there

Until the mist

Itself tends to takes a shape

The shape of myself.

 

At that troubled end

I try to get adjacent

I see smoke ash arranged in a motif

Later on the ashes gather in the shape

The shape of myself.

January- The Monthly Recap

This post is all about what was posted this month on Confessions of a Readaholic.

BOOK REVIEWS posted this month:

                     Continue reading “January- The Monthly Recap”

Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams and Other Prose Writings by Sylvia Plath

Being endured by an obsession with Sylvia Plath, I had waited too long to get my hands on this book. This is book is interesting for a multitude of reasons. The main reason being it’s Sylvia Plath’s proses, not poems. Previously, I had read The Bell Jar and her Journals, and certainly I was more fascinated by her journals rather her only novel.

This collection of her proses, short stories and a few pieces from Cambridge notes which were sad but also enthralling, written in time and some published here and there while others not, starts with a Ted Hughes introduction. Continue reading “Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams and Other Prose Writings by Sylvia Plath”

The College Window

The glimmer of the evening rays

Heavy sun of summer, sleepy,

Goes past me up the college Wall.

Below, in the lawn

Insufficient grass, with a rose

Standing in the middle, assisted by a hundred thorns.

Beyond the lawn, adjoins a pavement; rough and soothe

On which passes the world with shadows down at their feet,

Going left and right.

Continue reading “The College Window”

What to learn from Dante’s Inferno?

Dante’s Inferno offers a great amount of lessons that are considered to be moral and necessary. Born in Florence to a noble family, and ended up spending almost half of his life in exile Dante presents The Divine Comedy which is believed an epic, with various moral lessons and taking a reader’s conscience in to his grateful imagination that is altogether a different world from what we are living and it’s basis are the same moral values we believe in. In the review, I talked about how iconic it is that a piece of literature like Dante’s can survive almost 700 years and reaching a state of being well-known. That’s the beauty of his work.

“How hard it is to tell what it was like,
this wood of wilderness, savage and stubborn
(the thought of it brings back all my old fears),
a bitter place! Death could scarce be bitterer.
But if I would show the good that came of it
I must talk about things other than the good.”

Inferno Continue reading “What to learn from Dante’s Inferno?”