5 Stars, Book Reviews, Crime & Mystery, Fiction

BOOK REVIEW: Domina by Lisa Hilton

Published in April, 2017

Published in India: May, 2017

Pages 400, Paperback

Judging this book by its cover 4/5

Goodreads | Amazon

Sequel to last year’s “first class thriller” Maestra which sold in more than 43 countries and soon to be turned into a movie is finally out. Written by Lisa Hilton, charmingly, both of her books, Maestra and Domina are in regard of a competitor to Fifty Shades of Grey, another bestseller, but after reading, I think there’s more than Fifty Shades in her books. Her plot creation is full of thrilling effects, and a piece of her imagination equals more than just Fifty Shades.

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5 Stars, Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, Thrillers

BOOK REVIEW: Demons in My Mind by Aashish Gupta

 

Published: February, 2017

Pages: 330

Are you looking for a good read with chills and full of surprises? In fact, we all are looking for something that can give us an adrenaline rush just by turning pages. Demons in My Mind by Aashish Gupta is the one that will give you a boost this weekend.

An old man in a village in Nepal is suffering from cancer and wishes to be released from the pain that comes with the disease. He requests his fellow villagers to take him to the three monks. Everyone in the village has heard about them. Everyone in this village is fascinated by the legend of these three monks through their stories of miraculous healing.

Knowing that the sick man’s death is imminent, the villagers leave him alone near the Pashupatinath temple, Kathmandu hoping that the three monks, if they exist, would embrace him on the holy land. The old man wakes up to the sight of the three monks, but only to come across the real truth behind these monks as a series of surprises set off from there.

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Books, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Pimp by Shashank Gupta

Shashank Gupta’s debut work Pimp is a psychological thriller, an engaging plot that is full of events. From the first page of this book, it starts to show signs of how a book under the category of a thriller should be developed.

The protagonist who at the age of sixty, whose mind with considerable amount of wit is driven by desire and goes on to explore as one might refer to the sin of the flesh. Some might refer this to darkness of the human mind, I completely believe it’s just a part of it not entirely the darkness. The plot revolves around the protagonist and his stepmother, his passion of love and chaos.

There is a unique kind of mystery created by Shashank Gupta in this book. One doesn’t get to read this type of mystery or thrilling experience that grabs attention one’s mind completely. The narration is as uncommon as the mysteriousness and the dialogue between the characters are tenderly written for the reader to read.  Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: Pimp by Shashank Gupta”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

Crime and Punishment and Redemption

Redemption. We all seek redemption. Most of us are seeking it from our past self for an idealistic future self in various forms. Writing Crime and Punishment for Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a creative redemption from his past and some of his brother, originally titled The Drunkards. Dostoyevsky became fond of this project and rewrote a version of it from scratch, that we take in our hands today and proudly read.

From the start of the novel, the author accomplishes to decipher that the protagonist, Raskolnikov, is tortured by his own thoughts. A student, as many, poverty-stricken, plans an instantaneous murder of an old pawnbroker, thinking it will delay his poverty for few more weeks, completely ignorant of the aftermath and having minimal self-control. This act of morality follows an aftermath which turns out to be psychological for Raskolnikov and the author spots an absolute scenario of what happens after one stands on the brink of insanity using Raskolnikov as his puppet until the protagonist is bring in contact with his own buried conscience and another sufferer. On the engagement of the book and one’s mind, one will indulge in it actively enough as the plot moves forward.

There is suspense in the novel no doubt. Dostoyevsky, in some amount succeeds in the main theme which he tries to revolve around the story: redemption. Characters like Raskolnikov do have a place in a reader’s mind once they have acquired his attention, for longer period of time. But novels like itself, fails to provide strong reasoning for characters who prove to be a drag thoughtout it. I am not going to name a few, you have to read it and judge it for yourself. My assessment is this, when moving forward the path author wants it to and so does the reader, then why a writer like Dostoyevsky would use elements to create a labyrinth, a maze which has no possible point to prove through the novel and does proves to be unnecessary?
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Books, Essay

The World of Crime Fiction

In Italy, people call a story that consist of detectives or crimes giallo, for the word yellow. The reason is that since 1930s mostly crime fiction books had yellow covers. The earliest known crime fiction book is over twenty pages and is written by Danish author Steen Steensen Blicher and published in 1829. It is called The Rector of Veilbye and is supposedly based on a true murder case from 1626 in Vejlby, Denmark. The story is in the form of diary entries by a character named Erik Sorensen whose focus is on a trial about an unexplained disappearance of a farm labourer and after fifteen years the bones are unearthed.

The evolution and popularity of the genre increased in late nineteenth century in UK and USA, offering cheap paperbacks and mass producing them. Author like Arthur Conan Doyle made a huge contribution in the development of this literary genre for the famous detective Sherlock Holmes. Continue reading “The World of Crime Fiction”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Another year, another bestseller. A book that will keep on turning the pages by itself. It’s The Girl on the Train, one of the most successful books of the year, fastest selling adult novel in the history, another psychological thriller, comparable to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl as the plot is full of lies and unreliable narration.

The girl on the train is Rachel, a lonely, alcoholic divorcée who rides the train to and from London each day, hoping to keep her long-suffering roommate from discovering that she’s been fired from her job. The train, cruelly, passes each day by the house where she once lived with her adored ex-husband. Rachel directs her focus a few houses down, where another young couple lives, envying their seemingly blissful partnership. One day, she is shaken by what she sees at the couple’s house and soon after, the wife disappears. Rachel, convinced the event she witnessed is relevant to the case, is quickly drawn into the mystery, but her debilitating alcoholism and the blackouts caused by her binges make her an unreliable witness, untrusted by the authorities and even by herself. Continue reading “BOOK REVIEW: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins”

Books, Crime & Mystery, Fiction, Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: MISTRESS by JAMES PATTERSON & DAVID ELLIS

This was my seventh James Patterson’s book and I would say he writes better when he is not co-authoring. There were times when I read his Alex Cross‘ series or Women’s Mystery Club series and when I read his Private series or the Mistress. The difference would be in front of you. The difference is like between the day and the night. This fact may be true that he has sold more than combining Stephen King, Dan Brown and John Grisham, also, 19 consecutive No. 1 New York Times bestselling novels, and holds The New York Times record for most bestselling hardcover fiction titles by a single author but books like Mistress, it feels gone are those days when James Patterson was a real Page turner. It is just not his class or I would say, it’s not him. It’s a disgrace the way his books are written nowadays. Mistress being lengthy novel of 448 pages, the plot and the story are acceptable however the way of telling the story, the way of portraying the first person narrative was not good at all. Actually it was pretty bad, no reader would like to read the way this book is written.

In the past, I have always enjoyed Patterson’s books immensely. I used to like his style of short chapters and page turning essence his books had but now it seem, What the hell am I reading? It’s better if I read my textbooks.

After reading 100 pages you would realize that the main character of the book, Ben, might be an interesting character in this psychological thriller but reading further you will realize that before you just had a bad thought. Though I agree, it’s a fast read but I had to force myself to finish it. The character of Ben often goes  on and on about mundane facts which have nothing to do at all with the storyline. And due to this he is an annoying character. I am disappointed with this one. Looks like, I’ll have to go back to Alex Cross or Women’s Mystery Club.

I would advise not to buy and waste your money. Either loan it from a library or borrow from the person who has it.

I won’t recommend this one to anyone, and if I do… Dear Devil, I shall rot in hell.